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Reaction Stoichiometry - Reaction Stoichiometry Mass and...

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1 Mass is neither created nor destroyed during the course of a normal chemical reaction. 2 A useful generalization is that compounds containing only nonmetals are molecular in character, while compounds containing both metals and nonmetals are ionic. The examples chosen in this discussion happen to be molecular and the of the products generated in the experimental section are ionic in nature. The stoichiometric principles applied, however, are equivalent. 71 Reaction Stoichiometry Mass and Mole Relationships within Chemical Reactions DISCUSSION rexnstoi-A.wpd During a chemical reaction, reactants are transformed into new substances called products. Since atoms are neither created nor destroyed during the course of a normal chemical change, the total number of atoms of each element within the reactants must be equal to the total number of atoms of each element within the products. One simple perspective is that the reaction has produced a rearrangement of atoms from within the reactant compounds to form new combinations of atoms within the product compounds. Therefore reactant compound formulas yield the new, different compound formulas of the products. This concept nicely explains the Law of Conservation of Mass. 1 Consider the reaction below at the molecular level: 2 C 2 H 2 + 5 O 2 ! 4 CO 2 + 2 H 2 O 4 C atoms 4 C atoms 4 H atoms 4 H atoms 10 O atoms 10 O atoms Two molecules of acetylene, C 2 H 2 , react with five molecules of oxygen to yield four molecules of carbon dioxide and two molecules of water. 2 Since the number of atoms of each element is the same for both the reactants and products, it follows that the total mass of the reactants must equal the total mass of the products. The conservation of mass is demonstrated when the sum of all the molecular masses of the reactants is seen to be equal to the sum of all the molecular masses of the products: 2 C 2 H 2 + 5 O 2 ! 4 CO 2 +
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