Specific Heat - SPECIFIC HEAT The temperature of an object...

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1 SPECIFIC HEAT The temperature of an object is not the amount of heat contained in the object. This is a common misconception about temperature and heat. Temperature is actually an indicator of the internal kinetic energy possessed by the atoms in an object. Heat is actually the amount of thermal energy contained in an object. The amount of heat contained in an object is given by the relationship: Heat = mass of substance x specific heat x change in temperature It is most common for the change in temperature to be considered over some finite range, possibly from room temperature to some higher or lower final temperature. In this case, the expression gives the increase or decrease in the heat content of the object from room temperature to the final temperature. The specific heat (C p ) is an intrinsic property of the material from which the object is composed. The units of measurement for specific heat are Joules/gram Celcius (J/gºC or K). The specific heat of liquid water is 4.184 J/gºC. The specific heat of many other materials may be found in chemistry handbooks. The device used to measure the heat content of an object is called a calorimeter. It consists of a double walled container that minimizes heat transfer from inside to outside. The calorimeter is filled with a known mass of water. This allows a hot or cold object of known mass to be placed in the calorimeter and transfer its heat to the water with minimal loss to the outside. By
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course CHM 2045 taught by Professor Mitchell during the Fall '07 term at University of Florida.

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Specific Heat - SPECIFIC HEAT The temperature of an object...

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