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Chem8-10MolesStoich - Module 8 – Grams and Moles...

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Unformatted text preview: Module 8 – Grams and Moles Calculations In Chemistry Modules 8 to 10 Module 8 – Grams and Moles...................................................................................... 168 Lesson 8A: Lesson 8B: Lesson 8C: Lesson 8D: The Mole ............................................................................................................. 168 Grams Per Mole (Molar Mass)......................................................................... 169 Converting Between Grams and Moles ......................................................... 172 Converting Particles, Moles, and Grams........................................................ 176 Module 9 – Mole Applications .................................................................................... 182 Lesson 9A: Lesson 9B: Lesson 9C: Lesson 9D: Fractions and Percentages................................................................................ 182 Empirical Formulas........................................................................................... 186 Empirical Formulas from Mass or % Mass .................................................... 187 Mass Fraction, Mass Percent, Percent Composition..................................... 194 Module 10 – Balanced Equations and Stoichiometry.............................................. 201 Lesson 10A: Lesson 10B: Lesson 10C: Lesson 10D: Lesson 10E: Lesson 10F: Lesson 10G: Lesson 10H: Lesson 10I: Chemical Reactions and Equations................................................................. 201 Balancing Equations.......................................................................................... 204 Using Coefficients -- Molecules to Molecules ............................................... 210 Mole to Mole Conversions ............................................................................... 212 Conversion Stoichiometry................................................................................ 215 Percent Yield ...................................................................................................... 222 Finding the Limiting Reactant ......................................................................... 227 Final Mixture Amounts – and RICE Tables................................................... 234 Review Quiz For Modules 8-10 ......................................................................... 248 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page i Module 8 – Grams and Moles Module 8 – Grams and Moles Timing: Start this module when you are assigned problems using moles. Pretests: Even if this is easy review, you will need to learn the prompt method we will use for later topics. To do so, read each lesson and do at least the last problem on each problem set. If you get that problem right, move on to the next lesson. Prerequisites: You need to have completed Modules 2, 4, 5, and Lessons 6A and 6C. The other lessons are helpful, but not essential, for Module 8. ***** Lesson 8A: The Mole Counting Particles Molecules are extremely small. Visible quantities of a substance must therefore have a very large number of molecules, atoms, or ions. For example: One drop of water contains about 1,500,000,000,000,000,000,000 (1.5 x 1021) water molecules. Rather than writing numbers of this size when solving calculations, chemists use a convenient unit to count particles. As we count eggs by the dozen, or buy printer paper by the ream (500 sheets), we count chemical particles such as molecules, atoms, and ions by the mole. A mole is 6.02 x 1023 particles. The number 6.02 x 1023 is called Avogadro’s number. The mole was originally defined by counting the number of atoms in one gram of hydrogen, the lightest atom. The definition has changed slightly over time. We now base our count on the isotope carbon-12 (exactly 12 grams of C-12 contains exactly one mole of C-12), but the original definition based on hydrogen remains close to true. Picking a number for the mole, our counting unit, so that one mole of the lightest atom (hydrogen) has a mass close to one gram, simplifies the arithmetic in problems with other atoms, especially when we convert between grams and moles. That’s our goal: to calculate a count of particles by measuring their mass on a balance or scale. Counting the particles is important because in chemical reactions, particles react and form in simple whole number ratios - if we count of the particles. This makes the mole that is used to count visible numbers of particles the most important unit in chemistry. In calculations, if we do not know the moles involved, the rule will be: find moles first. In the SI (official metric) unit system, mole is abbreviated mol. As with all metric abbreviations, mol is not followed by a period, and no distinction is made between singular and plural when the abbreviation is used. Working with Moles Working with very large numbers is simplified by exponential notation. Recall that • 1023 means a 1 followed by 23 zeros: 100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 168 Module 8 – Grams and Moles • When multiplying a number times a number times an exponential, the numbers multiply by the normal rules of arithmetic, but the exponential does not change. Examples: Half a mole = 1/2 x (6.02 x 1023) = 3.01 x 1023 particles Ten moles = 10 x (6.02 x 1023) = 60.2 x 1023 = 6.02 x 1024 particles 0.20 moles = 0.20 x (6.02 x 1023) = 1.2 x 1023 particles Practice: Cover the answers below (large sticky notes make good answer covers). Then write, and then check, your answers below. 1. How many particles are in a. 4.0 moles? b. 0.050 moles (in scientific notation)? 2. Why is it convenient to set the value for our counting unit as 6.02 x 1023? ANSWERS Practice 1a. 24 x 1023 particles 1b. ? particles = 0.050 moles x (6.02 x 1023 particles/mole) = 3.0 x 1022 particles 2. For the lightest atom (hydrogen), one gram will roughly equal the mass of one mole of atoms. ***** Lesson 8B: Grams Per Mole (Molar Mass) Atomic Mass Each atom has a different average mass. The average atom of helium has a mass approximately 4 times that of the average hydrogen atom, because helium has more protons, neutrons, and electrons. Carbon atoms average about 12 times more mass than hydrogen atoms. The average mass of an atom is its atomic mass. Atomic mass is measured in atomic mass units (see Lesson 6B). Atomic masses for the atoms are listed at the end of this book and inside the cover of most chemistry textbooks. To encourage mental arithmetic, the atomic masses in these lessons use fewer significant figures than most textbooks. If you use a different table of atomic masses, your answers may differ slightly from the answers shown here. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 169 Module 8 – Grams and Moles Molar Mass The molar mass of an atom is the mass of a mole of the atoms. The number that represents the atomic mass of an atom in amu is the same as the number that measures the molar mass of an atom in units of grams per one mole. The molar mass of the lightest atom, hydrogen, is 1.008 g/mol. A mole of uranium atoms has a mass of 238.0 grams. For substances that contain more than one atom, the molar mass is easily determined. Simply add the molar masses of each of the atoms that make up the substance. In chemistry calculations, you will always be given atomic masses or allowed to consult a table of atomic masses. Example: What is the molar mass of NaOH? Add these molar masses: Na = O= H= 23.0 1 6 .0 1.008 40.008 = 40.0 g/mol NaOH SF: Recall from Lesson 3A that when adding significant figures, because the highest place with doubt in the columns above is in the tenth’s place, the sum has doubt in the tenth’s place. Round the answer to that place. The molar mass supplies an equality: 40.0 grams NaOH = 1 mole NaOH. When solving problems, after calculating a molar mass, the equality format should be written in the DATA. Include the formula for the substance on both sides of the equality. This will greatly simplify the reaction calculations in upcoming lessons. Molar Masses and Subscripts To calculate the molar mass from chemical formulas containing subscripts, recall that subscripts are exact numbers. Multiplying by a subscript therefore does not change the doubtful digit’s place in the result. When calculating a molar mass, use the following column format to keep track of the numbers and the place with doubt. Example: Find the molar mass of phosphoric acid: H3PO4 1 mol H3PO4 = 3 mol H 1 mol P 4 mol O = 3 x 1.008 g/mol = = 1 x 31.0 g/mol = = 4 x 16.0 g/mol = 3.024 31.0 64.0 9 8.0 24 98.0 g/mol In your DATA, write: 98.0 g H3PO4 = 1 mol H3PO4 The Importance of Molar Mass The molar mass is the most frequently used conversion in chemistry. Why? Grams of a substance are easy to measure using a balance or scale. Moles are difficult to measure directly, since we don’t have machines that count large numbers of particles. However, chemical processes are most easily understood by counting the particles. Using © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 170 Module 8 – Grams and Moles the molar mass, we can convert between the grams that we can measure and the particle counts that explain chemistry. If you know the chemical formula of a substance, you can calculate the molar mass of the substance. Practice: Use the table of atomic masses on the next-to-last page of this book. To speed your progress, try the last letter of each problem. If you have difficulty, try other letters of the same problem. Answers are at the end of this lesson. 1. Use your table of atoms to find the molar mass of these atoms. Include the unit with your answer. a. Nitrogen b. Au c. Pb 2. How many oxygens are represented in each of these formulas? a. Ca(OH)2 b. Al2(SO4)3 c. Co(NO3)2 Do the next two problems in your notebook. Allow enough room on the paper for clear and careful work. Use the column format of the H3PO4 molar mass calculation above. If this is easy review, do a few, but be sure to do problems 3e and 4b. 3. Calculate the molar mass for these compounds. Include units and proper sf in your answers. a. H2 b. NaH d. Na3PO4 c. KSCN 4. a. 1 mole H2S = ? grams H2S e. Barium nitrate b. ? grams AgNO3 = 1 mole AgNO3 ANSWERS b. Au 197.0 g mol 1a. Nitrogen 14.0 grams mole 2. a. Ca(OH)2 2 oxygens c. Pb b. Al2(SO4)3 12 oxygens 3a. H2 = 2 x H = 2 x 1.008 = 2.016 g/mol In your DATA, write 207.2 g mol c. Co(NO3)2 6 oxygens 2.016 g H2 = 1 mol H2 (Multiplying by an exact subscript does not change the place with doubt). 3b. NaH = Na = H= 3c. KSCN = 23.0 1.008 24.008 = 24.0 g/mol In the DATA, write 24.0 grams NaH = 1 mole NaH © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 K= S= C= N= 39.1 32.1 12.0 14.0 97.2 g/mol 97.2 g KSCN = 1 mol KSCN Page 171 Module 8 – Grams and Moles 3d. Na3PO4 = 3e. Barium nitrate = Ba(NO3)2 (Lesson 7C) = 3 x Na = 3 x 23.0 = 1 x P = 1 x 31.0 = 4 x O = 4 x 16.0 = 69.0 31.0 64.0 164.0 g/mol 164.0 g Na3PO4 = 1 mol Na3PO4 1 x Ba = 1 x 137.3 = 137.3 2 x N = 2 x 14.0 = 28.0 6 x O = 6 x 16.0 = 96.0 261.3 g/mol 261.3 g Ba(NO3)2 = 1 mol Ba(NO3)2 4. Question 4 is asking for the grams per one mole. That’s the molar mass. 4a. H2S = 4b. AgNO3 = 2 x H = 2 x 1.008 = 2.016 1 x S = 1 x 32.1 = 32.1 34.116 = 34.1 g/mol 1 mol H2S = 34.1 g H2S ***** 1 x Ag = 1 x 107.9 = 1 x N = 1 x 14.0 = 3 x O = 3 x 16.0 = 107.9 14.0 48.0 169.9 g/mol 169.9 g AgNO3 = 1 mol AgNO3 Lesson 8C: Converting Between Grams and Moles Knowing how to calculate the grams per one mole, we now want to be able to calculate the mass of any number of moles of a substance. The problem can be viewed as converting units, in this case from moles to grams. An equality, the molar mass, provides the conversion factor. The Grams Prompt In theater, a prompt is a word or two that reminds the players of what to do next. In chemistry, certain words or conditions can prompt us to do things automatically that will help in solving problems. Memorize the following rule as the Grams Prompt In a problem, either in the WANTED or DATA, if you see the grams or the prefix-grams (such as kg, mg, etc.) or the mass of a substance formula, • calculate the molar mass of that formula; then • write that molar mass as an equality in your DATA. Example: 1 mole H2O = 18.0 grams H2O The grams prompt will help to list in your DATA the conversions needed to SOLVE. If you see grams of a formula in a calculation problem, you will nearly always need the molar mass. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 172 Module 8 – Grams and Moles To convert between grams and moles of a substance, use the molar mass as a conversion factor. Use the WANTED, DATA, SOLVE format and the grams prompt to solve the following problem, then check your answer below. Q. What is the mass in grams of 0.25 moles of O2? * * * * * (See How To Use These Lessons, Point 1, on page 1). Answer WANTED: ? g O2 = DATA: 0.25 mol O2 32.0 g O2 = 1 mol O2 (grams O2 in the WANTED is a grams prompt) ***** SOLVE: ? g O2 = 0.25 mol O2 • 32.0 g O2 = 1 mol O2 8.0 g O2 A single unit is WANTED, so the data contains a single unit and it is the given quantity. The remaining DATA will be in pairs, written as equalities or ratios. SF: Since 0.25 has 2 sf, 32.0 has 3 sf, and 1 is exact, round the answer to 2 sf. In WANTED, DATA, and conversions, you must write the number, unit, and chemical formula for all terms. By writing the WANTED unit, you were prompted to write a conversion that was needed to solve. By listing needed conversions first, you can focus on arranging your conversions when you SOLVE. Writing out the WANTED, DATA, prompts, and labels takes time. However, this structured method of problem-solving will greatly improve your success in the complex problems that soon will be encountered. Practice A Try the last letter on each numbered question. If you get it right, go to the last letter of the next problem. If you need more practice to feel confident, do another letter of the numbered problem. Molar masses for problems 2-4 are found in either Problem 1 or the Lesson 8B practice. 1. Working in your notebook, find the molar mass for a. H2SO4 2. Finish. b. Aluminum nitrate ? grams NaOH = 5.5 moles NaOH • 40.0 g NaOH 1 mol NaOH © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 = Page 173 Module 8 – Grams and Moles 3. Supply the needed conversion and solve. a. ? grams H2SO4 = 4.5 moles H2SO4 • b. ? g AgNO3 = 0.050 mol AgNO3 (For molar mass, see Lesson 8B, Problem 4b.) 4. Use WANTED, DATA, PROMPT and SOLVE to do these in your notebook. a. 3.6 moles of H2SO4 would have a mass of how many grams? b. Find the mass in grams of 2.0 x 10─6 moles of Al(NO3)3 ? (See 1b above. Answer in scientific notation.) Converting Grams to Moles If the grams of a substance with a known formula are known, how do we find the moles? Use the molar mass as a conversion factor. Try the following problem in your notebook, then check the answer below. Q. How many moles are in 4.00 grams of O2? ***** WANT: ? mol O2 = DATA: A. 4.00 g O2 32.0 g O2 = 1 mol O2 SOLVE: ? mol O2 = 4.00 g O2 • 1 mol O2 = 32.0 g O2 (grams prompt) 0.125 mol O2 SF: 4.00 has 3 sf, 1 is exact (infinite sf), 32.0 has 3 sf; answer must be rounded to 3 sf. Practice B Start with the last letter on each numbered question. If you get it right, go to the next number. Need more practice? Do another part. Molar masses for these problems were calculated in the two prior sets of practice. 1. Supply conversions and solve. Answer in numbers without exponential terms. a. ? mol H2SO4 = 10.0 g H2SO4 • b. ? mol Ba(NO3)2 = 65.4 g Ba(NO3)2 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 174 Module 8 – Grams and Moles 2. Solve in your notebook. Answer in scientific notation. a. 19.62 kg of H2SO4 is how many moles? b. How many moles are in 51.0 mg of AgNO3 ? ANSWERS Practice A 1a. H2SO4 = 1b. Aluminum nitrate = Al(NO3)3 (Lesson 7B, 7C) (If needed, adjust your work and try again) 2 x H = 2 x 1.008 = 1 x S = 1 x 32.1 = 4 x O = 4 x 16.0 = 2.016 32.1 64.0 98.1 g/mol 98.1 g H2SO4 = 1 mol H2SO4 1 x Al = 1 x 27.0 = 3 x N = 3 x 14.0 = 9 x O = 9 x 16.0 = 27.0 42.0 144.0 213.0 g/mol 213.0 g Al(NO3)3 = 1 mol Al(NO3)3 Note in 1b, for the 9 oxygens, that multiplying by an exact 9 is the same as adding 16.0 nine times. Multiplying by an exact number does not change the place with doubt. 2. ? grams NaOH = 5.5 moles NaOH • 40.0 g NaOH = 220 grams NaOH 1 mole NaOH 3a. ? grams H2SO4 = 4.5 moles H2SO4 • 98.1 g H2SO4 = 440 g H2SO4 1 mol H2SO4 169.9 g AgNO3 = 8.5 g AgNO 3b. ? g AgNO3 = 0.050 moles AgNO3 • 3 1 mol AgNO3 4a. ? g H2SO4 = 3.6 mol H2SO4 • 98.1 g H2SO4 1 mol H2SO4 = 350 g H2SO4 4b. ? g Al(NO3)3 = 2.0 x 10─6 mol Al(NO3)3 • 213.0 g Al(NO3)3 = 4.3 x 10─4 g Al(NO3)3 1 mol Al(NO3)3 Practice B 1. a. ? mol H2SO4 = 10.0 g H2SO4 • 1 mol H2SO4 = 0.102 mole H2SO4 98.1 g H2SO4 b. ? mol Ba(NO3)2 = 65.4 g Ba(NO3)2 • 1 mole Ba(NO3)2 261.3 g Ba(NO3)2 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 = Page 175 Module 8 – Grams and Moles Answer: If you wrote .250 moles Ba(NO3)2, mark it wrong. If you wrote 0.250 moles Ba(NO3)2, go to the head of the class. Always write a 0 in front of a decimal point, if there is no number in front of the decimal point. This makes the decimal point visible when you need this answer for a later step of a lab report or test. ? mol H2SO4 = 19.62 kg H2SO4 • 103 g • 1 mol H2SO4 1 kg 98.1 g H2SO4 2a. = 2.00 x 102 mol H2SO4 ? mol AgNO3 = 51.0 mg AgNO3 • 10─3 g • 1 mol AgNO3 = 3.00 x 10─4 mol AgNO3 1 mg 169.9 g AgNO3 ***** 2b. Lesson 8D: Converting Particles, Moles, and Grams Prerequisites: To do this lesson, you need to have completed Lessons 1A and 1B on exponential notation, Module 4, Lessons 5A to 5D, and the prior Module 8 lessons. Pretest: Even if this is easy review, read the lesson, work the questions (Q) in the lesson and do the last two problems in the Practice. ***** Problems Involving a Large Number of Particles We know that one mole of anything = 6.02 x 1023 of anything. A mole is like a dozen, only bigger. You will likely need Avogadro’s number in calculations • that convert between a count of very small particles (such as molecules, atoms, or ions) and units used to measure visible amounts of particles, such as grams or liters, • and/or when DATA includes a very large exponential term, such as 1023 or any other “two-digit positive exponential.” Let’s call this rule the Avogadro Prompt If a calculation either includes a large exponential (10xx) number of particles or converts between a number of very small particles and units used to measure visible amounts, write under DATA: 1 mole (substance formula) = 6.02 x 1023 (substance formula) Add that rule to the previous Grams Prompt If the WANTED or DATA includes grams (or prefix-grams) of a substance formula, write in your DATA the molar mass equality for that formula. Example: 1 mole H2O = 18.0 grams H2O © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 176 Module 8 – Grams and Moles Cover the answer below and in your notebook, apply the WANTED, DATA, SOLVE method and the two prompts to solve this problem. Q. What is the mass in grams of 1.5 x 1022 molecules of H2O? ***** WANT: ? g H2O = DATA: 1.5 x 1022 H2O molecules 1 mol H2O = 6.02 x 1023 H2O molecules 1 mol H2O = 18.0 g H2O (10xx calls Avogadro prompt.) (WANTED unit calls the g prompt.) SOLVE: ? g H2O = 1.5 x 1022 H2O • 1 mole H2O 6.02 x 1023 H2O 1.5 x 1022 = • 18.0 g H2O = 1 mol H2O • 18.0 g H2O = 4.5 x 10―1 g H2O or 0.45 g H2O 6.02 x 1023 There are several ways to do the arithmetic in the problem above. You may use any that work, but try doing the exponential math without a calculator (see Lesson 1C). Try one more. Q. How many atoms are in 5.7 grams of F2? ***** WANTED: DATA: ? atoms F 5.7 g F2 1 mol F2 molecules = 38.0 g F2 molecules (grams prompt) 1 F2 molecule = 2 F atoms Prompts: (Mix of invisible atoms and visible grams = Avogadro prompt.) 1 mol F2 = 6.02 x 1023 F2 molecules Note the labels above. In most problems, we work with molecules, and molecules is left out of our labels as understood. However, if a problem mixes molecules and atoms, we need to distinguish between molecules and atoms carefully. If a problem mixes atoms and molecules, label atoms and molecules in the DATA. If needed, adjust your work and finish. ***** SOLVE: 23 molecules F = 2 • 2 atoms F ? atoms F = 5.7 g F2 • 1 mol F2 • 6.02 x 10 38.0 g F2 1 mol F2 molecules 1 molecule F2 = 1.8 x 1023 atoms F © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 177 Module 8 – Grams and Moles Flashcards For the cards below, cover the answers, try the questions, and add questions that cannot be answered automatically to your collection. Run them once to perfection, then use them to do the problems below. Repeat for two more days, then put these cards in stack #2 (see Lesson 6E). One-way cards (with notch) Back Side -- Answers To find molar mass from a substance formula Add the molar masses of its atoms The units of molar mass Grams per 1 mole To convert between grams and moles Use the molar mass equality In DATA, write the molar mass as 1 mol formula = # g formula If you see grams or prefix-grams in WANTED or DATA Write the molar mass equality in the DATA If a calculation includes 10xx of a substance If a calculation mixes units measuring visible amounts (g, mol, mL…) with units measuring invisibles (atoms, molecules, particles…) In the DATA, write 1 mol (formula) = 6.02 x 1023 (formula) In the DATA, write 1 mol (particles) = 6.02 x 1023 (particles) Practice Run the flashcards, then solve these problems in your notebook. Save one problem for your next study session. Problems 4 and 5 are more challenging. 1. 3.55 grams of Cl2 gas (chlorine gas) contain how many molecules of Cl2 ? 2. 8.0 x 1024 atoms of aluminum have a mass of how many kilograms? 3. How many millimoles of oxygen atoms are in 6.40 x 10─2 g O2 ? 4. 2.57 nanograms of S8 would contain how many sulfur atoms? 5. A magnesium ribbon of uniform width and thickness has a mass of 0.750 g Mg/meter. How many magnesium atoms are in 5.25 cm of the ribbon? 6. Check the conversions in your answers. In how many cases did you start by converting the given unit until you had moles of the given substance on top? © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 178 Module 8 – Grams and Moles ANSWERS Your paper should look like this, but you may omit the (comments) in parentheses. 1. WANTED: DATA: ? molecules Cl2 3.55 g Cl2 71.0 g Cl2 = 1 mol Cl2 SOLVE: (grams prompt) 1 mol Cl2 = 6.02 x 1023 molecules Cl2 (mix g and molecules = Avogadro prompt) 23 ? molecules Cl2 = 3.55 g Cl2 • 1 mol Cl2 • 6.02 x 10 molecules Cl2 1 mol Cl2 71.0 g Cl2 = 3.01 x 1022 molecules Cl2 2. In metals, the particles in the “molecular formula” are individual atoms, so the metal “molecules” are the same as the metal atoms, and the molar mass is the mass of a mole of metal atoms. ***** WANTED: ? kg Al DATA: 8.0 x 1024 Al atoms (10xx = Avogadro prompt) 1 mol Al = 6.02 x 1023 Al atoms 1 mol Al = 27.0 g Al (any prefix-grams = grams prompt) SOLVE: ? kg Al = 8.0 x 1024 Al atoms • • 27.0.0 g Al • 1 kg 1 mol Al atoms 6.02 x 1023 Al atoms 3. WANTED: DATA: 1 mol Al = 0.36 kg Al 103 g ? millimoles O atoms 6.40 x 10─2 g O2 molecules 32.0 g O2 = 1 mol O2 molecules SOLVE: (grams prompt) 1 molecule O2 = exactly 2 atoms O (if both molecules and atoms, label carefully) ? mmol O atoms = 6.40 x 10─2 g O2 • 1 mol O2 • 2 atoms O • 1 mmol 32.0 g O2 1 mol O2 = 4.00 mmol O atoms 10─3 mol If milliliters = mL, then millimoles = mmol . milli- = “ 10─3 ” ; 1 milli-anything = 1 x 10─3 anythings Since the WANTED and given units were grams and moles, the molar mass that converts between grams and moles was needed, but the Avogadro conversion needed for invisibles was not. 4. WANTED: DATA: ? atoms S 2.57 nanograms S8 1 ng = 10─9 g (writing the less frequently used prefix equalities is a good idea) 256.8 g S8 = 1 mol S8 molecules 1 mol S8 = 6.02 x 1023 molecules S8 (any prefix-grams = grams prompt) (Invisible atoms and visible moles = Avo. prompt) 1 molecule S8 = exactly 8 atoms S © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 179 Module 8 – Grams and Moles (Note that the molar mass of S8 is the mass of a mole of molecules. If needed, adjust your work and complete the problem.) ***** SOLVE: ─9 23 ? atoms S = 2.57 ng S8 • 10 g • 1 mol S8 • 6.02 x 10 molec. S8 • 8 atoms S = 4.82 x 1013 1 molec. S8 atoms S 1 ng 256.8 g S8 1 mol S8 (SF: The 8 atoms per molecule is exact, and the 8 therefore does not restrict the number of sf in the answer. Exact numbers have infinite sf.) 5. WANTED: DATA: ? atoms Mg 0.750 g Mg = 1 meter Mg 5.25 cm Mg 24.3 g Mg atoms = 1 mol Mg atoms 1 mol atoms = 6.02 x 1023 atoms (grams prompt) (atoms = small particles = Avogadro prompt) (In metals, the particles in the “molecular formula” are individual atoms, so the metal “molecules” are the same as the metal atoms, and the molar mass is the mass of a mole of metal atoms.) SOLVE: (Want a single unit? Start with single unit.) ─2 23 ? atoms Mg = 5.25 cm Mg • 10 m • 0.750 g Mg • 1 mol Mg • 6.02 x 10 atoms = 9.75 x 1020 1 cm 1 meter Mg 24.3 g Mg 1 mol atoms Mg 6. All have moles of given on top. In chemistry calculations, if you are not given moles, job #1 is nearly always to convert to moles of given substance, because nearly all key relationships are based on moles. ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 180 Module 8 – Grams and Moles SUMMARY: Module 8 – Grams and Moles 1. Chemical processes are easiest to understand if you count the particles involved. Large numbers of particles are counted by the mole. 2. 1 mole of anything = 6.02 x 1023 anythings. That’s Avogadro’s number. 3. If you know the chemical formula for a substance, you can calculate the grams per mole of the substance: the molar mass. 4. To find the molar mass of a substance, add the molar masses of its atoms. 5. The units of molar mass are grams per one mole. 6. If molar mass is WANTED, write 7. If a molar mass is DATA, write WANTED: ? g mol 1 mol formula = XX g formula 8. To convert between grams and moles, use the molar mass as a conversion factor. 9. Grams Prompt If a problem mentions grams or prefix-grams of a substance formula, write in the DATA, (Molar Mass) grams of formula = 1 mole of formula 10. Avogadro Prompt If a calculation includes 10xx of a substance, or includes both a count of invisibly small particles and units used to measure visible amounts, write in your DATA: 1 mole (formula) = 6.02 x 1023 (formula) 11. If a problem mixes atoms and molecules, label atoms and molecules in the DATA. 12. To solve most chemistry calculations, first convert to moles. ##### © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 181 Module 9 – Mole Applications Module 9 – Mole Applications Lesson 9A: Fractions and Percentages Timing. Do this lesson when an assignment includes fraction or percent. Pretest. If you earn a perfect score, skip this lesson. Answers are at the end of the lesson. 1. 0.6% is what decimal equivalent? 2. 45/10,000 is what decimal equivalent and what percent? ***** Fractions A fraction is a ratio: one quantity divided by another. In math, a fraction can be any ratio, but in science, “fraction” often (but not always) refers to a part of a larger total: a smaller quantity over a larger quantity. In dealing with percentages and fractions, we will call this Rule 1. Fraction = Quantity A Quantity B and often equals Part Total The decimal equivalent of a fraction is a number that results by dividing the top number of the fraction (the numerator) by the bottom number (the denominator). An example of a fraction and its decimal equivalent is 1/2 = 0.50 Rule 2. To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the top by the bottom. Use your calculator if needed to answer: Q. The decimal equivalent of 5/8 = ________ ***** A. 0.625 In chemistry calculations, the term “fraction” can refer to any fixed decimal number from 1.00 to 0.00 (such as 0.25) that can be obtained by dividing one quantity by another. In terms of numeric value, a fraction and its decimal equivalent are the same. Fraction = Decimal equivalent In chemistry, both 1/2 and 0.50 are termed fractions. Depending on the context, when a chemistry problem asks “what is the fraction…” it may be asking for • a fraction in an x/y format, or • a decimal equivalent number such as 0.25 . Usually, from the context and examples of related problems, it will be clear what type of fraction is wanted. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 182 Module 9 – Mole Applications Calculating Percentages A percent multiplies a decimal equivalent by 100%. A familiar example is 1/2 = 0.50 x 100% = 50%. For those who are not math-inclined, percentages provide more familiar numbers to measure change than numbers with decimals. However, when a percent is required for an answer, in most chemistry calculations you will need to solve for the decimal equivalent first, then convert to percent. To convert a decimal equivalent to a percent, multiply by 100% (moving the decimal twice to the right). Let’s call this Rule 3. Percent = fraction x 100% = (decimal equivalent ) x 100% To find a %, find the decimal equivalent first. To find a %, write the fraction, then the decimal equivalent, then the %. Example: 1/8 is what percent? Write the fraction, then its decimal equivalent, then multiply by 100%. 1/8 = 0.125 x 100% = 12.5% Apply Rule 3 to this problem: Q. 25 is what percentage of 400? ***** The rule: if you WANT a percentage, first write the fraction, then its decimal equivalent. In this problem, the question is: the smaller number is what part of the larger number? Write the fraction definition and fill in the numbers. ***** Fraction = Part = Smaller = 25 Total Larger 400 ***** Fraction = Part = Smaller = 25 Total Larger 400 ***** = ____________ (fill in the decimal equivalent) = 0.0625 What will the percentage be? Percent = fraction x 100% = (decimal equivalent ) x 100% = 0.0625 x 100% = 6.25% Similarly, if you are given a percentage to use in a calculation, you must change the percentage to its decimal equivalent. Conversion calculations and mathematical equations nearly always require numeric values (the fraction or its decimal equivalent), not the percentages that are “values x 100%”. Since Percent = (decimal equivalent) x 100% , © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Decimal equivalent = Percent / 100% . Page 183 Module 9 – Mole Applications Let’s call this Rule 4 . Change a percentage to its decimal equivalent before use in conversions. To change a percentage to its decimal equivalent, divide by 100% (moving the decimal twice to the left). Decimal equivalent of percent = Percent / 100% Examples: In calculations, change 25% to 0.25 ; change 0.50% to 0.0050 Apply Rule 4 to this problem. Q. 3.5 percent of 12,000 is ? ***** If fractions for you are easy math, solve in any way you wish. If you need a systematic approach, try the following. For percentages in calculations, the fundamental rules are, • if you are given a percentage, as step one convert it to a decimal equivalent; • if you WANT a percentage, first find the decimal equivalent WANTED. In this problem, since we were given a percent, step one is to convert to the decimal equivalent. Decimal equivalent = percentage / 100% = 3.5% / 100% = 0.035 There are many ways to solve from here. Having converted to the fraction, it may be intutitive that 3.5% of 12,000 = 0.035 x 12,000 = If not, a more methodical way is to solve this equation using our equation method: Fraction = decimal equivalent = Smaller Larger Make a data table that matches the terms in the boxed equation. ***** DATA: Decimal equivalent = 0.035 Smaller = ? (Since the number be asked for is less than 100% of 12,000, it is smaller) Larger = 12,000 SOLVE: (solve the boxed equation for the WANTED variable, then substitute.) ? = Smaller = (decimal equivalent) x (larger) = 0.035 x 12,000 = 420 Sanity check: since 10% of 12,000 is 1,200 , 3.4% should be about 400? Check. There are many ways to solve fraction and percentage calculations. Use one that works for you. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 184 Module 9 – Mole Applications Practice: First memorize the rules above, then do each of these problems. 1. 1/5 is what decimal equivalent and what percent? 2. 4.8% is what decimal equivalent? 3. 9.5/100,000 is what decimal equivalent and percent? 4. What percentage of 25 is 7? 5. What amount is 0.450% of 7,500. ? 6. Twelve is what percent of 24,000? ANSWERS Pretest: 1. 0.006 2. 0.0045, 0.45% Practice 1. Decimal equivalent of 1/5 = 0.20 Percent = decimal equivalent x 100% = 20.% 2. Decimal equivalent = percent / 100% = 4.8% /100% = 0.048 3. Move the decimal 5 times to divide by 100,000. Decimal equivalent = 0.000095 = 9.5 x 10―5 Percent = decimal equivalent x 100% = 0.000095 x 100% = 0.0095% = 9.5 x 10―3 % 4. To calculate percent, calculate fraction, then decimal equivalent, then percent. Fraction = Part = 7 = 0.28 Total 25 Percent = fraction x 100% = decimal equivalent x 100% = 0.28 x 100% = 28% What fraction of 25 is 7? 5. To calculate an amount, change % to decimal equivalent by dividing by 100%. 0.450% / 100% = 0.00450 ? = 7,500 x 0.00450 = 34 6. To calculate a percent, write the fraction, then the decimal equivalent, then percent. 12 is what part of 24,000? = 12 is what fraction of 24,000? 12 = 0.5 x 10―3 = 5.0 x 10―4 Fraction = Part = 12 = Total 24,000 24 x 103 This number in exponential notation is a decimal equivalent. A decimal equivalent is any numeric value that has no denominator (which means 1 is the denominator) and is derived from a fraction. Percent = fraction x 100% = decimal equivalent x 100% = = 5.0 x 10―4 x 100% = 5.0 x 10―2 % = 0.050 % 7a. Decimal equivalent of percent = percent / 100% = 0.6% /100% = 0.006 7b. To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide. 45/10,000 = 0.0045 Percent = fraction x 100% = decimal equivalent x 100% = 0.0045 x 100% = 0.45% ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 185 Module 9 – Mole Applications Lesson 9B: Empirical Formulas Timing. There are two types of empirical formula problems. • Type I supplies a molecular formula and asks for the empirical formula. Type I problems are easy, and they are often included in the first chapter of chemistry texts. • Type II problems supply the fraction or percentage of the total mass for each of the atoms in a compound and asks for the empirical formula. Type II problems can be done only after learning grams to moles conversions. Lesson 9B covers Type I problems. Lesson 9C covers Type II. If you are assigned empirical formula problems that involve substance formulas but not masses, do Lesson 9B. When you are assigned Type II problems (those that include grams), do Lessons 9B and 9C. ***** Empirical Formula Problems: Type I Empirical formulas are related to, but are not the same as, molecular formulas. Molecular formulas tell the actual number and kind of atoms bonded together in a molecule. Rule 5. Empirical formulas show the lowest whole-number ratios of the atoms in a compound. Examples: The molecular formula for benzene is C6H6. The empirical formula for benzene is CH. The molecular formula for glucose is C6H12O6. The empirical formula for glucose is CH2O. The best way to remember the empirical formula definition is to add an example to rule 5. Rule 5. Empirical formulas show the lowest whole-number ratios of the atoms in a compound. The empirical formula of C6H12O6 is CH2O. In some cases, there are preferred orders for listing the atoms in compounds. In compounds containing carbon and hydrogen, the preferred order is usually C, H, O, then other atoms. For other types of empirical formulas, you may list the atoms in any order (but oxygen is usually listed last). Empirical means “established by experiment or experience,” rather than from theory. Measurements using the tools of analytical chemistry can provide the mass percent of each atom in a compound to a high degree of accuracy. This result can be converted to an empirical formula that can be a key piece of evidence in identifying an unknown compound. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 186 Module 9 – Mole Applications However, while an empirical formula is evidence, it is not proof of the identity of a chemical unknown. Compounds with very different molecular or structural formulas and different chemical and biological behaviors can have the same empirical formula. Practice: Find the empirical formula for these compounds. 1. Octane (a constituent of gasoline): C8H18 2. Ethylene glycol (used in car-radiator antifreeze): C2H6O2 3. Acetic acid (mixed with water to form vinegar): CH3COOH 4. Cyclooctane: C8H16 ANSWERS: 1. C4H9 5. Benzene: C6H6 2. CH3O 3. CH2O 6. Cyclooctatetraene: C8H8 4. CH2 5. CH 6. CH ***** Lesson 9C: Empirical Formulas from Percent Mass Prerequisites. Module 8, plus Lessons 9A and 9B. Pretest. If you think you know how to calculate empirical formulas, try Problem 2 at the end of this lesson. If you solve correctly, you may skip this lesson. ***** Empirical Formula Calculations A Type II empirical formula problem supplies either a mass percent or actual mass of the atoms in a sample of a compound and asks you to calculate the empirical formula. The steps in calculating an empirical formula are based on its definition. An empirical formula shows the lowest whole-number mole ratios for the atoms in a compound. To help in recalling the steps for empirical formula calculations, memorize Rule 6. To calculate an empirical formula, find grams then moles then the lowest whole-number mole ratios. A table will help to organize these calculations. To learn the table method, do the following steps for this problem. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 187 Module 9 – Mole Applications Q. A pure colorless liquid is found to have a composition of 39.2% carbon, 8.73% hydrogen, and 52.1% oxygen, by mass. Determine the empirical formula. Steps for Calculating Empirical Formulas 1. Write WANTED and describe what you are looking for. 2. Write Strategy and, from memory, Rule 6 for empirical-formula calculations. 3. Make a table with these 7 columns: Atom Grams (% =g) Molar Mass Moles Mole Ratios Moles Lowest Moles Lowest Ratios Multiplied Until Whole # Close to Whole Mole Ratios Numbers 4. Fill in the first four columns. a. If data is supplied in mass percents, use this rule. Rule 7. In empirical formula calculations, given the mass percent of an atom, assume a 100 g sample so that % = grams in the sample. A mass percent can be applied to a sample of any size. By choosing to assume sample size of exactly 100 grams, if 25% of the grams in the sample are atom X, the sample has 25 g of X. b. For column 4, do one conversion below the table. Thereafter for these repetitive calculations, use the rule: moles = grams/(grams/mole) . Complete steps 1-4, then check your answer below. ***** WANTED: Strategy: Atom Empirical formula = lowest whole-number mole ratios Find grams then moles then the lowest whole-number mole ratios. Grams (% =g) Molar Mass Moles C 39.2 g 12.0 g/mol 8.73 g 1.008 g/mol 8.661 mol O 52.1 g 16.0 g/mol Lowest Ratios Whole # Multiplied Until Close to Mole Ratios Whole # 3.266 mol H Mole Ratios Moles Lowest Moles 3.256 mol © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 188 Module 9 – Mole Applications A sample conversion: ? mol C = 39.2 g C • 1 mol C = 3.266 mol C 12.0 g C In calculations, we round to sf at the end of a calculation. In a similar fashion, in calculations with multiple parts or steps, it is a preferred practice to carry an extra sf until the end of the calculations. Both of these rules minimize changes in the final answer due to rounding in the middle steps. Rule 8. SF and steps: In calculations that have more than one part (including empirical formula calculations), carry an extra digit, beyond the doubtful digit, until the end of the problem. 5. Calculate the mole ratios. a. In column 4, circle the lowest number of moles. b. In column 5, divide each mole value by the lowest number of moles. Do those steps and then check your answer below. * * *** Atom Grams (% =g) Molar Mass Moles Mole Ratios Moles Lowest Moles C 39.2 g 12.0 g/mol 3.266 mol (3.266/3.256) = 1.003 H 8.73 g 1.008 g/mol 8.661 mol 2.660 O 52.1 g 16.0 g/mol 3.256 mol Lowest Ratios Whole # Multiplied Until Close to Mole Ratios Whole # 1 6. To find the lowest whole-number mole ratios, use trial and error. a. If all of the mole ratios are close to whole numbers, write the whole numbers that they are close to in the last column. b. If any one or more of the mole ratios are not close to a whole number, fill-in column 6. In column 6, if any mole ratio in column 5 ends in close to • .25 or .75, quadruple all of the mole ratios. • .33 or .67, triple all mole ratios. • .5, double all mole ratios. Repeat these steps until your column 6 ratios are all close to whole numbers. Empirical formula calculations rarely result in perfect whole-number ratios because they are taken from experimental data, and such data always has error. For empirical formula calculations, close is good enough. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 189 Module 9 – Mole Applications c. In the last column, write the whole numbers that the column 6 ratios are close to. Do those steps, and then check your answer below. ***** Atom Grams (% =g) Molar Mass Moles Lowest Ratios Multiplied Whole-# Until Close Mole Ratios to Whole # 3 3.009 (3.266/3.256) = 1.003 Mole Ratios Moles Lowest Moles C 39.2 g 12.0 g/mol 3.266 mol H 8.73 g 1.008 g/mol 8.661 mol 2.660 7.980 8 O 52.1 g 16.0 g/mol 3.256 mol 1 3 3 The mole ratios are not all close to whole numbers, but 2.66 is close to 2 2/3. Multiplying all of the mole ratios by 3 will “get rid of the thirds” and give column 6, in which the numbers are all close to whole numbers. 7. Below the table, write “Empirical formula:” Then write each atom symbol from the first column. Write the whole number in the last column after each symbol as a subscript. If there is a 1 in the last column, write the atom symbol without a subscript. (If a subscript is omitted, a 1 is understood.) Example: If the whole number ratios are C = 1 and H = 2, the empirical formula is written CH2 . Do step 7, then check your answer below. ** *** The empirical formula for the compound above is written as C3H8O3 . The above process works for most, but not all empirical formulas. For large molecules with complex mole ratios, finding a multiplier for column 5 that will give close to whole numbers in column 6 may require additional trial and error. Practice: Practice until you can write the seven column headings from memory, then solve these. For additional practice, work problems from any textbook that have answers you can check. 1. A sample of an alcohol is found to have 52.2% carbon, 13.1% hydrogen, and 34.8% oxygen, by mass. What is the empirical formula of the alcohol? 2. A sample of a pure compound is composed of 15.8% aluminum, 28.0% sulfur, and 56.2% oxygen. Find the empirical formula for this compound. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 190 Module 9 – Mole Applications ANSWERS 1. WANTED: Strategy: Atom Empirical Formula = lowest whole-number mole ratios of the atoms To calculate an empirical formula, find grams then moles then the lowest wholenumber mole ratios. Grams (% =g) Molar Mass Moles Mole Ratios Moles Lowest Moles Lowest Ratios Whole-# Multiplied Until Close to Mole Ratios Whole # C 52.2 g 12.0 g/mol 4.350 mol (4.350/2.175) = 2.000 2 H 13.1 g 1.008 g/mol 13.00 mol H 5.977 6 O 34.8 g 16.0 g/mol 2.175 mol 1 1 Sample table calculations: 52.2% carbon (C) in a 100 gram sample = 52.2 g C ? mol C = 52.2 g C • 1 mol C = 4.350 mol C 12.0 g C (If a problem has parts, carry an extra sf at each step until the end of the problem.) The mole ratios 2.00, 5.96, and 1 are close to the whole numbers 2, 6, and 1. For empirical formulas, close to a whole number is good enough. Write the empirical formula based on the first and last columns: C2H6O. 2. WANTED: Strategy: Atom Empirical Formula = lowest whole-number mole ratios. For empirical formula, find grams then moles then the lowest whole-number mole ratios. Grams (% =g) Molar Mass Moles Mole Ratios Moles Lowest Moles Lowest Ratios Multiplied Whole-# Until Close Mole Ratios to Whole # 2 2 Al 15.8 g 27.0 g/mol 0.5852 mol 1 S 28.0 g 32.1 g/mol 0.8723 mol H 1.491 2.982 3 O 56.2 g 16.0 g/mol 3.512 mol 6.001 12.002 12 Sample calculations: 15.8% Al by mass, in a 100 gram sample = 15.8 g Al ? moles Al = 15.8 g Al • 1 mole Al = 0.5852 mole Al (carry extra sf) 27.0 g Al The mole ratios are not close to whole numbers, but 1.491 is close to 1.5 = 1 ½ = 3/2 . If we multiply by 2, we get rid of halves. Doubling the mole ratios gives column 6, in which all ratios are close to whole numbers. Empirical formula: Al2S3O12 ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 191 Module 9 – Mole Applications Lesson 9D: Mass Fraction, Mass Percent, Percent Composition Timing: Do this lesson when mass fraction, mass percent, or percentage composition is first mentioned in class or problem assignments. Prerequisites: Complete Module 8 plus Lesson 9A before starting this lesson. Pretest: If you think you know how to do these problems, try Problem 2 at the end of this lesson. If you answer correctly, skip the lesson. ***** Mass Fraction A mass fraction is a fraction made from two masses: (g of part)/(g of total) . The mass fraction of an atom in a compound is the ratio of the mass of the atom in the compound to the total mass of the compound. The value of a mass fraction will always be expressed as a decimal value between 0 and 1. Mass fraction of atom ≡ Part g from atom = 0.XXX Total g of compound ( ≡ means “is defined as”) Compounds have a characteristic composition: the different atoms that are found the compound are always present in the exactly the same ratio. Those atoms have a characteristic mass. These facts mean that for a given substance, the mass fraction of an atom in a compound is always the same no matter what consistent unit is chosen to measure mass or what size sample is measured. To calculate a mass fraction, the easiest sample size to work with is one mole of the compound. By using one mole, the terms in the mass fraction calculation are the terms that are used in calculating the molar mass. For example, the molar mass of carbon dioxide can be calculated in a column format that emphasizes the arithmetic and the place with uncertainty: 1 mol CO2 = 1 mol C + 2 mol O = 1 x 12.0 g C = + 2 x 16.0 g O = 12.0 g C + 32.0 g O 44.0 g CO2 or rearranged to emphasize the equalities in the calculation: 1 mole CO2 = 1 mole C + 2 moles O = = (1)(12.0 g C) + (2)(16.0 g O) = = 12.0 g C + 32.0 g O = = 44.0 g CO2 Compare the two formats. Do both calculate molar mass? Are they the same? In the second, the DATA is the same, but format emphasizes that the molar-masscalculation steps are a series of equalities. Our fundamental conversion-factor rule is: Any two terms that are related in equalities can be used as a conversion factor. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 192 Module 9 – Mole Applications Let’s summarize the above as Rule 9. Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g atom in 1 mol compound = 0.XXX total g in compound total g in 1 mole of compound To find a mass fraction, select from the terms added to find the molar mass. and apply Rule 9 to a problem. Q. Find the mass fraction of oxygen in nitrogen dioxide. Do the steps below in your notebook. 1. Prompt: When you see “mass fraction,” write Rule 9. 2. Write the specific ratio WANTED in the problem. WANTED: Mass Fraction O in NO2 = gO g NO2 3. Write out the calculation of the molar mass in the equalities format. 4. In the molar mass calculation, find the two terms that have the units and substance formulas found in the WANTED ratio. Circle those terms: the number, unit, and formula. Do those steps and then check your answer below. ***** 1 mol NO2 = 1 mol N + 2 mol O = = (1) (14.0 g N) = 14.0 g N = 46.0 g NO2 + (2) (16.0 g O) = + 32.0 g O = 5. Substitute those numbers, units, and substance formulas into the WANTED fraction, then calculate the decimal equivalent. ***** SOLVE: Mass Fraction O in NO2 = gO = 32.0 g O = 46.0 g NO2 g N O2 0.696 g O g NO 2 Practice A 1. Calculate the mass fraction of hydrogen in glucose, C6H12O6 . © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 193 Module 9 – Mole Applications The Mass of an Atom in a Sample The terms in a molar mass calculation can be used in a ratio (such as the mass fraction equation) or as a conversion factor (which is a ratio equal to one) to convert between grams of an atom in a compound and grams of the compound. Let’s call this Rule 10. For calculations involving g of a compound and g of an atom in the compound, select from terms added to find the molar mass. Using standard conversion factor methods, try the following problem in your notebook, then check your answer below. Q. Find the grams of carbon in an 11.0 gram sample of carbon dioxide. ***** WANTED: ? g C in a carbon dioxide sample DATA: 11.0 g CO2 SOLVE: To solve for a single unit, start with the starting template. ? g C = 11.0 g CO2 • _____________ g CO 2 Is there a ratio that will convert g CO2 to g C for carbon dioxide? ***** Apply Rule 10. 1 mole CO2 = 1 mol C + 2 mol O = = (1)(12.0 g C) = = SOLVE: 12.0 g C + (2)(16.0 g O) = 44.0 g CO2 ? g C = 11.0 g CO2 • + 12. 0 g C = 44.0 g CO2 32.0 g O = 3.00 g C If two terms are related in equalities, the terms can be used as a conversion factor. Practice B 1. Calculate the mass fraction of sulfur in sulfuric acid (H2SO4). 2. How many grams of hydrogen are in 10.0 grams of sulfuric acid? © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 194 Module 9 – Mole Applications Mass Percent The mass percent (or percent mass) of an atom in a compound is simply the mass fraction times 100%. Rule 3. Percent = fraction x 100% = (decimal equivalent ) x 100% To find a %, find the decimal equivalent first. To find a %, write the fraction, find the decimal equivalent, then write the %. When mass percent is WANTED, find the mass fraction, then decimal equivalent, then %. Example: From the section above, the mass fraction of O in NO2 is 0.696 The mass percent of O in NO2 = mass fraction x 100% = 0.696 x 100% = 69.6 % Cover the answer below, then try this problem in your notebook. Q. In potassium permanganate (KMnO4), what percentage of the mass is from oxygen? ***** WANTED: Mass percent O in KMnO4 Strategy: When % is WANTED, write fraction, then decimal equivalent, then %. Mass Fraction O in KMnO4 = WANTED: gO g KMnO4 Rule 9. Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g atom in 1 mol compound = 0.XXX total g compound total g in 1 mole of compound To find mass fraction, select from terms added to find the molar mass. 1 mole KMnO4 = 1 mole K + 1 mole Mn + 4 moles O = 39.1 g K + 54.9 g Mn + (4)(16.0 g O) = 39.1 g K + 54.9 g Mn + 64.0 g O = 158.0 g KMnO4 ? = Mass fraction O in KMnO4 = gO g KMnO4 = 64.0 g O = 0.405 158.0 g KMnO4 ? = Mass percent O in KMnO4 = 0.405 x 100% = 40.5 % ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 195 Module 9 – Mole Applications Percent Composition Percent composition means the percent by mass of each of the atoms in a compound. Rule 11. Percent composition of a compound = mass percent for each atom. The percentages must add up to 100% (or very close). To calculate the percent composition of a compound, simply calculate the percent mass of each atom in the compound. Dalton’s Atomic Theory The calculations of percentage composition and empirical formulas are based on the atomic theory proposed by the English scientist John Dalton in 1808. Dalton combined earlier proposals that • all matter is composed of tiny individual atoms that cannot be created nor destroyed; with his new theories that • chemical reactions cannot convert one type of atom into another; • each atom has a characteristic mass and other unique properties; and • a compound has a characteristic ratio of its different atoms. Dalton’s atomic theory formed the foundation for modern chemistry. Flashcards In this module, there have been 11 rules (summarized at the end of the module). You can learn the rules as a numbered list or you can convert the rules to flashcards. You may want to divide the rules, putting short rules on flashcards, but writing a numbered list for the more complex rules, prompts, or formulas. However you decide to learn the 11 rules, you will recall them more easily if space your practice over several days. Each day, practice the rules first, then use them to solve problems. Then, before your quiz or test on the material, practice recalling the rules from memory, then do a few additional problems. Practice C For additional practice, work examples or problems in a regular chemistry textbook that have answers you can check. 1. What percent of the mass of alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, is from nitrogen? 2. A 200. gram sample of KClO4 contains how many grams of oxygen? 3. Calculate the percent composition for aluminum oxide (Al2O3). © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 196 Module 9 – Mole Applications ANSWERS Practice A 1. WANTED: Strategy: WANTED: Mass percent H in C6H12O6 When percent is WANTED, find fraction first. gH Mass Fraction H in C6H12O6 = . g C6H12O6 When you see “mass fraction,” write Rule 9. Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g atom in 1 mol compound = 0.XXX total g compound total g in 1 mole of compound To find mass fraction, select from terms added to find the molar mass. DATA: 1 mole C6H12O6 = 6 moles of C + 12 moles of H + 6 moles of O = (6)(12.0 g C) + (12)(1.008 g H) + (6)(16.0 g O) = 72.0 g C + 12.096 g H + 96.0 g O = 180.1 g C6H12O6 SOLVE: Mass fraction H = 12.096 g H = 0.06716 180.1 g C6H12O6 (SF: coefficients and subscripts are exact numbers with infinite sf.) Practice B 1. WANTED: Mass Fraction S in H2SO4 = gS g H2SO4 Strategy; Rule 9. When you see mass fraction, write Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g atom in 1 mol compound = 0.XXX total g compound total g in 1 mole of compound To find mass fraction, select from terms added to find the molar mass. DATA: 1 mole H2SO4 = 2 mole H + 1 mole S + 4 moles O = (2)(1.008 g H) + (1)(32.1 g S) + (4)(16.0 g O) = 2.016 g H + 32.1 g S + 64.0 g O = 98.1 g H2SO4 SOLVE: ? = Mass fraction S in H2SO4 = © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 = 32.1 g S gS g H2SO4 98.1 g H2SO4 = 0.327 Page 197 Module 9 – Mole Applications 2. WANTED: ?gH DATA: 10.0 g H2SO4 SOLVE: ? g H = 10.0 g H2SO4 • _____________ g H2SO4 A ratio is needed that relates g H2SO4 to the WANTED g H. Rule 10. For calculations involving g of a compound and g of an atom in the compound, select from added to find the molar mass. 1 mol H2SO4 = 2 mol H + 1 mol S + 4 mol O = (2)(1.008 g H) + (1)(32.1 g S) + (4)(16.0 g O) (multiplying by exact numbers, including subscripts, does not change the place with doubt.) = 2.016 g H = SOLVE: + 32.1 g S + 64.0 g O 98.1 g H2SO4 2.016 g H ? g H = 10.0 g H2SO4 • = 0.206 g H 98.1 g H2SO4 Practice C 1. WANTED: Strategy: WANTED: Mass percent N in C3H7NO2 When percent is WANTED, find fraction first. gN Mass Fraction N in C3H7NO2 = g C3H7NO2 When you see mass fraction, write Rule 9. Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g atom in 1 mol compound = 0.XXX total g compound total g in 1 mole of compound To find mass fraction, select from terms added to find the molar mass. DATA: 1 mole C3H7NO2 = 3 moles C + 7 moles H + 1 mole N + 2 moles O = (3)(12.0 g C) + (7)(1.008 g H) + (1)(14.0 g N) + (2)(16.0 g O) = 36.0 g C + 7.056 g H + 14.0 g N + 32.0 g O = 89.1 g C3H7NO2 14.0 g N SOLVE: Fraction grams N = = 0.157 = 15.7 % N by mass 89.1 g C3H7NO2 2. WANTED: DATA: Strategy: ?gO 200. g KClO4 You want g O. You are given g KClO4 . What equality relates them? © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 198 Module 9 – Mole Applications Rule 10. For calculations involving g of a compound and g of an atom in the compound, select from the terms added to find the molar mass. 1 mole of KClO4 = 1 mole K + 1 mole Cl + 4 moles O = = 39.1 g K + 35.5 g Cl + (4)(16.0 g O) = 39.1 g K + 35.5 g Cl + 64.0 g O = 138.6 g KClO4 SOLVE: (Want a single unit? Start with the one single unit in your DATA.) ? g O = 200. g KClO4 • 3. WANTED: 64.0 g O = 92.4 g O 138.6 g KClO4 % composition of Al2O3 Rule 11. Percent composition of a compound = mass percent for each atom. The percentages must total close to 100% Rule 3. Percent = fraction x 100% = (decimal equivalent ) x 100% To find a %, find the fraction first. To find a percentage, write the fraction, then decimal equivalent, then %. Rule 9. Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g atom in 1 mol compound total g compound total g in 1 mole of compound = 0.XXX To find mass fraction, select from terms in the molar mass calculation. DATA: 1 mol Al2O3 = 2 mol Al + 3 mol O = (2)(27.0 g Al) + (3)(16.0 g O) = 54.0 g Al + 48.0 g O = 102.0 g Al2O3 SOLVE: Fraction Al grams = 54.0 g Al = 0.529 = 52.9 % Al 102.0 g Al2O3 Fraction O grams = 48.0 g O = 0.470 = 47.1 % O 102.0 g Al2O3 Check: Sum of % must equal 100% (or very close). 52.9% + 47.1% = 100.0% ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 199 Module 9 – Mole Applications SUMMARY: Mole Applications 1: Fraction = Quantity A Quantity B and often equals Part Total 2: To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the top by the bottom. 3: Percent = fraction x 100% = (decimal equivalent ) x 100% To calculate a percentage, calculate the fraction first. To find a %, write the fraction, then decimal equivalent, then %. 4 Before calculating, change percents to decimal equivalents. 5. Empirical formulas show the lowest whole-number ratios of the atoms in a compound. The empirical formula of C6H12O6 is CH2O . 6. To calculate an empirical formula: • In table 1, convert mass percents to grams then moles. • In table 2, find the lowest whole-number mole ratios. 7. In empirical formula calculations, given the percent mass of an atom, assume a 100 g sample, so that % = grams. 8: SF and steps: In calculations that have more than one part (including empirical formula calculations), carry an extra digit, beyond the doubtful digit, until the end of the problem. 9: Mass fraction ≡ part g from atom = g of atom in 1 mol compound total g compound total g in 1 mole of compound To find a mass fraction, select terms from the molar mass calculation. 10. For calculations involving grams of a compound and grams of an in the compound, use the terms in the molar mass calculation. 11. Percent composition of a compound = mass percent for each atom. Percentages must total very close to 100%. To find an empirical formula from mass percents, use a 100 g sample. To find mass fraction, mass percent, percent mass, or percent composition from a chemical formula, select terms from the molar mass calculation. ##### © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 200 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Module 10 – Stoichiometry Prerequisites: To do this module, you need to have completed Modules 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8. (The others are helpful, but not necessary, for Module 10.) ***** Lesson 10A: Chemical Reactions and Equations Chemical Reactions An example of a chemical reaction is the burning of hydrogen gas (H2) to produce steam (hot H2O gas). To burn something is to react it with oxygen gas (O2) to form one or more new substances. Chemical equations are the language used to describe chemical reactions. In a chemical equation written using molecular formulas, the above reaction would be represented as 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O (1) This equation can be read as either “two H two plus one O two react to form two H two O,” or as “two molecules of hydrogen plus one molecule of oxygen react to form 2 molecules of water.” The substances on the left side of a reaction equation are termed the reactants. The substances on the right side of the arrow are the products. In chemical reactions, reactants are used up and products form. Most chemical reactions are represented by equations using molecular formulas, as in (1) above. However, more information is supplied if the equation is written using structural formulas. An example is H H O H O H H OO H H (2) H Compare equation (1) to equation (2). Are they the same reaction? ***** Yes. However, by writing the structural formulas it is easier to see that in many respects, after the reaction, not much has changed. We began with four hydrogen atoms and two oxygen atoms; we end with the same. In chemical reactions, bonds break, and new bonds form, but the number and kind of atoms stays the same. The fact that chemical reactions can neither create nor destroy atoms is called the law of conservation of atoms or the law of conservation of matter. In this usage, conservation means that what you start with is conserved at the end. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 201 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Before, during, and after a reaction, there is also conservation of mass: the total mass of the reactants and products also does not change. Total mass is determined by the number and kind of atoms, which a chemical reaction does not change. What does change? Because of the new positions of the bonds, after the reaction the products will have characteristics and behavior that are different from those of the reactants. In the above reaction, the hydrogen molecules on the left are explosive when ignited, but the water molecules on the right are quite stable. The oxygen molecules on the left side cause many materials to burn. To stop burning, we often use the water on the right. The position of the bonds can also change the economic value of atoms. The historic importance of chemistry to society has included the discovery of reactions that change • brittle rock into metals that can be molded and shaped; • willow bark into aspirin; and fungus into antibiotics; • animal waste into explosives; and sand into computer chips for electronic devices. Another outcome of chemical reactions is quite often the storage or release of energy. In burning hydrogen to form water, large amounts of stored energy are released. Including the energy term, the burning of hydrogen is represented as 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O + energy It was the release of energy from this simple reaction that led to the explosive destruction of the airship Hindenburg in 1937. Currently, researchers are seeking ways to harness the energy released by burning hydrogen as an alternative to burning gasoline in cars. Nearly all reactions either absorb or release energy, but if energy is not the focus of a particular problem, the energy term is often omitted when writing a reaction equation. Reaction Equation Terminology 1. In the substance formula H2O , the 2 is a subscript. The omission of a subscript, such as after the O in H2O , means the subscript is understood to be 1. 2. In a reaction equation, if 5 H2O is a term, the 5 is a called a coefficient. Coefficients are exact numbers that express the exact particle ratios in a reaction. If no coefficient is written in front of an equation term , the coefficient is understood to be 1. It is important to distinguish between subscripts and coefficients. • Subscripts are numbers written after and lower than the atom symbols in a molecule or ion formula. Subscripts count the atoms of each type inside the particle. • Coefficients are numbers written in front of a particle formula. Coefficients represent the particle ratios in a reaction: a count of how many of one particle reacts with how many of another particle. 3. If the number and kind of atoms on each side of an equation are the same, the equation is said to be balanced. The coefficients of a balanced chemical equation show the exact ratios in which the particles react (are used up) and are formed. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 202 Module 10 – Stoichiometry After balancing, if no coefficient is written in front of an equation term , the coefficient is understood to be 1. In a balanced equation, writing a coefficient of 1 is optional. 4. To balance equations, we will need to count atoms based on coefficients and subscripts. To count each kind of atom in a term in a reaction equation, multiply the coefficient times the subscript(s) for the atom. For example: The term 5 H2O represents 5 molecules of water. Each molecule has 3 atoms. In those 5 molecules are (5 x 2) = 10 hydrogen atoms and (5 x 1) = 5 oxygen atoms. Write your answers to this problem. Q. Count the H atoms in a. 5 CH4 b. 3 CH3COOH c. 2 Pb(C2H5)4 ***** a. Each molecule has 4 H atoms. 5 molecules = 5 x 4 H = 20 H atoms. b. Each molecule has 4 H atoms. 3 molecules = 3 x 4 H = 12 H atoms. c. The H in this case has two subscripts. Multiply 2 x 4 x 5 = 40 H atoms Practice: If you are not sure that your answer is correct, check the answers at the end of the lesson before proceeding to the next question. 1. Label the reactants and products in this reaction equation. Circle the coefficients. 4 Fe + 3 O2 2 Fe2O3 2. How many oxygen atoms are represented in a. 7 Na3PO4 b. 3 Co(OH)2 c. 2 No(NO3)2 d. 5 Al2(SO4)3 3. How many total atoms are represented in 2a and 2d above? 4. The following equation uses structural rather than molecular formulas C + C + H─H + H─H + H─H HH || H─C─ C─H || HH a. Is the equation balanced? b. Write the reaction using molecular formulas (the type used in problem 1). c. In going from reactants to products, what changed? What stayed the same? Changes: Stays the same: © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 203 Module 10 – Stoichiometry ANSWERS 1. 4 Fe + 3 O2 2 Fe2O3 Reactants 2a. 7 Na3PO4 28 Products 2b. 3 Co(OH)2 6 2c. 2 No(NO3)2 12 2d. 5 Al2(SO4)3 60 The total number of atoms is the coefficient times each subscript that applies to the atom. 3. 2a: 56 and 2d: 85 4a. Yes. There are the same number and kind of atoms on each side. 4b. 2 C + 3 H2 4c. Changes: The number of bonds, the bond locations, the molecules, stored energy, and the appearance and characteristics of the substances involved. C2H6 Stays the same: The numbers of each kind of atom and the total mass. ***** Lesson 10B: Balancing Equations Prerequisites: Lessons 6A, 6B, and 10A. Pretest: If balancing equations is familiar, do Problems 5h and 6c at the end of this lesson. If you get those right easily, you may skip to Lesson 10C. If not, do the lesson. ***** Balancing By Trial and Error The coefficients that balance an equation are not always supplied with the equation. However, if you are given the chemical formulas for the reactants and products of a reaction, you can find the coefficients by trial and error. One consequence of the law of conservation of atoms is that only one set of ratios will balance a chemical equation. However, since coefficients are ratios, if you multiply all the coefficients by the same number, you continue to have a balanced equation. This means that a balanced equation may be shown with different sets of coefficients, so long as the ratios among the coefficients are the same. Example: 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O and H2 + 1/2 O2 H2O are the same balanced equation, because the coefficient ratios are the same. In a balanced equation, showing a coefficient that is one is not required, but it’s not improper, either. During balancing, adding the 1’s will help in tracking what steps have been done. Let’s learn to balance an equation by example. Using the question below, cover the answer that is below the * * * * * line, write your answer to the step, and then check your answer. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 204 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Q. The burning of n-propanol can be represented by the unbalanced equation C3H7OH + O2 CO2 + H2O 1. Most important: During balancing, you cannot change a formula or a subscript. To balance, you must add numbers to the equation, but the only numbers that you can add are coefficients that go in front of the substance formulas. 2. Put a coefficient of 1 in front of the most complex formula (the one with the most atoms or the most different kinds of atoms). If two formulas seem complex, choose either one. ***** In this case, propanol is the most complex, so start with 1 C3H7OH + O2 CO2 + H2O 3. Now add coefficients to the other side that must be true if atoms are balanced. ***** In chemical reactions, atoms cannot be created or destroyed. In chemical equations, each side of the arrow must have the same kinds of atoms, and the same number of each kind of atom. Each term in a chemical equation is a coefficient followed by a substance formula. To count the number of each kind of atom represented by a term, multiply the coefficient by the subscript(s) for that atom. To count each type of atom on a side, add the atoms in each term on that side. Above, the left side has 3 carbon atoms. Since only CO2 on the right has C, the only way to have 3 carbon atoms on the right is to have the CO2 coefficient be 3. The left has 8 hydrogen atoms total; since only H2O on the right has H, the only way to have 8 H atoms on the right is to have the H2O coefficient be 4. So far, this gives us 1 C3H7OH + ___ O2 3 CO2 + 4 H2O The right side is now finished, because each particle has a coefficient. Only the O2 on the left side lacks a coefficient. 4. Add the coefficient that must be true for the oxygen to balance. ***** We count the oxygens on the right and get 10. We see 1 oxygen in propanol, which means we have must have a total of 9 oxygens from O2. We can write 1 C3H7OH + 9/2 O2 3 CO2 + 4 H2O (1) or we can multiply all of the coefficients by 2. 2 C3H7OH + 9 O2 6 CO2 + 8 H2O (2) Since coefficients are ratios, and both sets of ratios above are the same, both answers above are equally correct. We can multiply all the coefficients by the same number and still have the same ratios and a balanced equation. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 205 Module 10 – Stoichiometry To check that Equations (1) and (2) are both balanced, fill in the chart at the right. C Atom Count Side Left H Right Left O Right Left Right Rxn (1) Rxn (2) ***** Both are balanced. The second equation has the same ratios at the first. ***** Atom Count C Side Left H Right Left O Right Left Right Rxn (1) 3 3 8 8 10 10 Rxn (2) 6 6 16 16 20 20 Balancing Using Fractions As Coefficients Fractions are permitted when adding coefficients to balance equations. In some types of problems, including some energy calculations, the use of fractions to balance equations is required. In other situations, fractions may be inappropriate (you cannot have half a molecule). We will address these differences as we encounter them. At this point, our major use for coefficients will be as ratios in calculating amounts of substances involved in chemical reactions. The arithmetic in these calculations will be easier if whole number coefficients are used. In most upcoming cases, if we encounter fractions when balancing, it will simplify the arithmetic if all terms are multiplied by the fraction’s denominator, to change from fractions to whole-number coefficients. Practice Read each numbered step below, then do every other or every third lettered problem. As you go, check answers at the end of this lesson. If you need more practice at a step, do a few more letters for that step. Save a few for your next practice session. 1. A balanced equation must have the same number of each kind of atom on both sides. To check for a balanced equation, count the total number of one kind of atom on one side, then count the number of that kind of atom on the other side. The left and rightside counts must be equal. Repeat those counts for each kind of atom in the equation. Using this counting method, label each equation below as balanced or unbalanced. a. 2 Cs + Cl2 2 CsCl b. 4 HI + O2 2 H2O + I2 c. Pb(NO3)2 + 2 LiBr d. BaCO3 + 2 NaCl © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 PbBr2 + LiNO3 Na2CO3 + BaCl2 Page 206 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 2. In the equations below, one coefficient has been supplied. Use that coefficient to decide one or more coefficients on the other side. Then use your added coefficient(s) to go back and forth, from side to side, filling the remaining blanks on both sides to balance the equation. Some coefficients may be fractions. Fractions are permitted when balancing. Remember that balancing is trial and error. Do what works. If you need help, check your answer after each letter. Tip: It usually helps to balance last the atom used in two or more different formulas on the same side. Oxygen is the atom most frequently encountered in compounds, so “saving O until last” usually helps in balancing. a. 4 Al + ____ O2 b. 6 Ca + ____ N2 c. ____ P4 + _____ O2 d. ____ C6H14 + ____ O2 e. ____ MgH2 + ____ f. ____ C2H6 + 7 O2 ____ Al2O3 ____ Ca3N2 2 P4O6 18 CO2 + ____ H2O H2 O 2 Mg(OH)2 + ____ H2 ____ CO2 + ____ H2O 3. To balance these, start by placing a 1 in front of the underlined substance. a. K+ F2 b. Cs + c. PCl3 d. C2H5OH + e. FeS + KF O2 Cs 2 O P4 + O2 O Cl2 2 CO2 + F e 2 O3 + H2O SO2 4. When balancing equations without suggested ways to start, Begin by putting a 1 in front of the most complex formula on either the left or right side of the equation (the one with the most atoms, or the most different kinds of atoms). If two formulas are complex, use either one. Then add as many coefficients as you are sure of to the side opposite the side where you put the 1. On this problem, if you get a fraction as you balance, multiply all of the existing coefficients by the denominator of the fraction. Repeat this step if you get additional fractions while balancing. Fractions are permitted, but it will be easier in most calculations if you have whole-number coefficients. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 207 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Expect to need to start over on occasion, because balancing is trial and error. Be persistent! All of the equations below can be balanced. a. Mg + O2 MgO b. N2 + O2 NO c. C6H6 + d. P4 + e. Al + O2 CO2 + O2 H2O P4O6 AlBr3 + HBr H2 5. As with fractions, lowest whole-number coefficients are not required, but they are preferred when writing most balanced equations. For example, if at the end of balancing, all of your coefficients are even numbers, it is preferred to divide all the coefficients by 2. On these, balance, then convert answers to lowest-whole-number ratios. a. Al2O3 + HCl b. Fe3O4 + H2 c. C+ d. N2 + e. Rb2O + f. Mg(NO3)2 + g. Pb(C2H5)4 + h. Cd + AlCl3 + Fe SiO2 CO + O2 + H2O H2O + H2O H2O SiC HNO3 RbOH Na3PO4 O2 Mg3(PO4)2 + PbO + Cd(NO3)2 + HNO3 NaNO3 CO2 + H2O + H2O NO 6. Write the formulas then balance. (Need formula help? See Lessons 7B and 7C.) a. Dinitrogen tetroxide b. Barium carbonate + cesium chloride c. Silver nitrate + calcium iodide © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Nitrogen dioxide cesium carbonate + barium chloride silver iodide + calcium nitrate Page 208 Module 10 – Stoichiometry ANSWERS: Coefficients of 1 may be omitted as understood. la. 2 Cs + Cl2 c. Pb(NO3)2 + 2 LiBr d. BaCO3 + 2 NaCl 2 CsCl 2. a. 4 Cr + 3 O2 Balanced b. 4 HI + O2 Not balanced 2 H2O + I2 Not balanced PbBr2 + LiNO3 Na2CO3 + BaCl2 Balanced 2 Cr2O3 c. 2 P4 + 6 O2 b. 6 Ca + 2 N2 d. 3 C6H14 + 57/2 O2 2 P4O6 e. 2 MgH2 + 4 H2O 2 Ca3N2 18 CO2 + 21 H2O 2 Mg(OH)2 + 4 H2 (2e is tricky because H is used in more than one formula on each side, rather than the usual O. Save until last the atom that is in two compounds on one or both sides.) f. 3 2 C2H6 + 7 O2 a. 2 K + F2 c. e. 4 CO2 + 6 H2O 2 KF b. 4 Na + O2 2 Na2O 4 PCl3 P4 + 6 Cl2 d. C2H5OH + 3 O2 2 CO2 + 3 H2O Fe2O3 + 2 SO2 2 FeS + 7/2 O2 4. Your answers may be different so long as the ratios among all of the coefficients are the same. A coefficient of 1 may be omitted as “understood.” c. e. 2 MgO 2 Mg + 1 O 2 2 C6H6 + 15 O2 2 Al + 6 HCl a. b. 1 N2 + 1 O2 12 CO2 + 6 H2O d. 1 P4 + 3 O2 2 NO 1 P4O6 2 AlCl3 + 3 H2 5. Lowest whole-number coefficients were requested, so your coefficients must match these exactly. a. 1 Al2O3 + 6 HCl c. 3 C + 1 SiO2 e. g. 1 Rb2O + 1 H2O 2 RbOH 3 Mg(NO3)2 + 2 Na3PO4 1 Mg3(PO4)2 + 6 NaNO3 2 PbO + 16 CO2 + 20 H2O 2 Pb(C2H5)4 + 27 O2 h. 3 Cd + 8 HNO3 f. 6. a. c. 1 N2O4 2 AlCl3 + 3 H2O 2 CO + 1 SiC 3 Fe + 4 H2O d. 2 N2 + 5 O2 + 2 H2O 4 HNO3 3 Cd(NO3)2 + 4 H2O + 2 NO 2 NO2 2 AgNO3 + CaI2 b. 1 Fe3O4 + 4 H2 b. BaCO3 + 2 CsCl Cs2CO3 + BaCl2 2 AgI + Ca(NO3)2 ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 209 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Lesson 10C: Using Coefficients: Molecules to Molecules Flashcards: Let’s summarize the reaction fundamentals learned so far. Cover the flashcard answers below, then put a check by the questions you can answer easily and quickly. Make flashcards (Lesson 2C) for those you cannot. Consider using a different color of card for this new module. Run the new cards for 3 sessions in a row, then put them in stack #2 (the Run Before End of Chapter/Next Quiz Stack). One-way cards (with notch). Questions: Back Side -- Answers Cannot change during chemical reactions Atoms present and total mass In chemical reactions, used up are the Reactants In chemical reactions, formed are the Products Numbers inside a formula that count atoms Subscripts Numbers you add to balance equations Coefficients To balance an equation, start by Putting 1 in front of most complex formula The law of conservation of mass means During a reaction, total mass does not change. What is balanced in a balanced equation that contains neutral substance formulas? The number and kind of atoms on each side The Meaning of Coefficients Balanced chemical equations tell the ratios in which molecules or formula units are used up and form. For example, the burning of the hydrocarbon paraffin, used in some types of candles, can be represented as C25H52 + 38 O2 25 CO2 + 26 H2O The equation states that burning 1 molecule of paraffin uses up 38 molecules of oxygen. The products are 25 molecules of carbon dioxide and 26 molecules of water. Reactants are used up and products form in known, predictable ratios. What would happen if you burned 2 molecules of paraffin? You would use up twice as much oxygen (76 molecules), and you would produce twice as much product: 50 molecules of CO2 and 52 molecules of H2O. The ratios of the substances used up and formed stay the same. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 210 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Practice Do these in your head and write your answers below. Check your answers after each problem as you go. 1. For the balanced equation 4 HBr + O2 2 Br2 + 2 H2O a. If 16 molecules of HBr react, i. how many molecules of O2 must react? ii. How many molecules of Br2 must form? b. If 5 molecules of O2 react, i. how much HBr must react? ii. How much Br2 must form? 2. For the reaction CS2 + O2 CO2 + SO2 a. Balance the equation. b. If 25 trillion molecules of CS2 react, i. how many molecules of O2 must also be used up? ii. How many molecules of SO2 must form? ANSWERS 1a(i). 16 molecules HBr need 4 molecules O2 (the ratio must be 4 HBr to 1 O2) 1a(ii). 16 molecules of HBr make 8 molecules Br2 (the ratio must be 4 HBr to 2 Br2) 1b. 20 molecules HBr react, 10 molecules Br2 form. 2a. CS2 + 3 O2 CO2 + 2 SO2 b(i). 75 trillion O2 (ii) 50. trillion SO2 ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 211 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Lesson 10D: Mole to Mole Conversions Conversions Based on Coefficients Coefficients are exact numbers because they are determined by counting atoms as you balance equations. You may have 1, 2, or 3 atoms, but you cannot have 3.1 atoms. In chemical reactions and processes, atoms are indivisible. Coefficients therefore have no uncertainty. This balanced equation 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O means that • 2 molecules of H2 used up equals exactly 1 molecule of O2 used up; • 2 molecules H2 consumed means that exactly 2 molecules of H2O are formed; • If 1 molecule of O2 reacts, exactly 2 molecules of H2O must form. In this sense, any two terms in a balanced equation are “equal.” Two terms that are equal or equivalent can be made into conversion factors. From the equation above, we can write three equalities that can be used as conversions: • 2 molecules H2 used up = 1 molecule O2 used up • 2 molecules H2 used up = 2 molecules H2O formed • 1 molecule O2 used up = 2 molecules H2O formed Mole-to-Mole Conversions The units in the above equalities are molecules. Coefficients can also be read in exact moles, because once the coefficient ratios from the balanced equation are known, those ratios can be multiplied by any number and the equation will still be exactly balanced. A mole is simply a large number. Since the above three molecule-to-molecule equalities are true, the following three mole-tomole equalities must be true. In the ratios of reaction for 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O, 2 moles H2 = 1 mole O2 2 mol H2 = 2 mol H2O 1 mol O2 = 2 mol H2O Counting the particles is the key to understanding chemical processes. Most reaction calculations involve visible amounts of a substance, and we count visible amounts of particles in moles. In the equalities above, the coefficients supply mole-to-mole conversion factors that are simple whole numbers. In reaction calculations, these equalities based on coefficients will be our bridge conversions between the given and WANTED units. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 212 Module 10 – Stoichiometry A key rule in solving reaction calculations is the Mole-to-Mole Bridge Prompt: In reaction calculations, if the WANTED substance ≠ the given substance, ( ≠ means does not equal) • Balance the equation using whole-number coefficients; and • Bridge: write the bridge conversion: X mol WANTED = Y mol given in which X and Y are the substance coefficients from the balanced equation. • Use this bridge conversion to SOLVE. Use the bridge prompt to solve the problem below. Cover the answer, use the WANTED, DATA, SOLVE format, and then check your answer. Q. Burning ammonia with appropriate catalysts can result in the formation of nitrogen monoxide by the reaction 4 NH3 + 5 O2 4 NO + 6 H2O How many moles of NH3 are needed to form 9.0 moles of H2O? ***** WANTED: ? mol NH3 9.0 mol H2O DATA: Strategy: Since NH3 ≠ H2O, balance the equation (done above) and then write the WANTED moles to given moles equality. We could write 4 mol NH3 used up = 6 mol H2O formed , or abbreviate this to 4 mol NH3 = 6 mol H2O (Finish from here) ***** SOLVE: Begin with the starting template. ? mol NH3 = 9.0 mol H2O • ______________ ; then use the bridge. mol H2O ***** ? moles NH3 = 9.0 mol H2O • 4 mol NH3 = 6.0 mol NH3 6 mol H2O SF: 9.0 has two sf. Coefficients are exact with infinite sf. Round the answer to two sf. Practice. Learn the prompt, then apply it from memory. 1. For the reaction 3 Fe + 4 H2O Fe3O4 + 4 H2 a. How many moles of H2O are needed to react with 7.24 moles of Fe? b. How many moles of Fe3O4 can be formed from 3.6 moles Fe? © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 213 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 2. Burning ammonia can result in the formation of water and elemental nitrogen: 4 NH3 + 3 O2 2 N2 + 6 H2O a. By this reaction, how many moles of O2 are required to burn 14.0 moles of NH3 ? b. How many moles of O2 are used up if 20.0 moles of N2 forms? 3. For the unbalanced equation NaClO3 NaCl + O2 how many moles of O2 can be obtained from 2.50 moles of NaClO3 ? ANSWERS Your paper should look like this, but you may omit the (comments) in parentheses. WANTED: ? mol H2O DATA: 7.24 mol Fe Bridge: 4 Mol H2O = 3 mol Fe SOLVE: 1. a. ? mol H2O = 7.24 mol Fe • 4 mol H2O = 9.65 mol H2O 3 mol Fe ? mol Fe3O4 b. WANTED: DATA: (Strategy: (Since WANTED ≠ given, write the bridge.) 3.6 mol Fe For a reaction, if formula WANTED ≠ formula given, balance (done) and ….) Bridge: 3 Mol Fe = 1 mol Fe3O4 SOLVE: ? mol Fe3O4 = 3.6 mol Fe • 1 mol Fe3O4 3 mol Fe WANTED: 1.2 mol Fe3O4 ? mol O2 DATA: 2a. = 14.0 mol NH3 (Strategy: Since the formula WANTED ≠ formula given, balance the equation (above), then write the mole–to-mole bridge. Use it to solve.) Bridge: 3 Mol O2 = 4 mol NH3 SOLVE: (Order your conversions in the usual way, beginning with the starting template.) ? mol O2 = 14.0 mol NH3 • 3 mol O2 = 10.5 mol O2 4 mol NH3 b. WANTED: DATA: (Strategy: Bridge: SOLVE: ? mol O2 20.0 mol NO Since the formula WANTED ≠ formula given, write the mole-to-mole conversion.) 3 mol O2 = 2 mol N2 ? mol O2 = 20.0 mol N2 • 3 mol O2 2 mol N2 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 = 30.0 mol O2 Page 214 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 3. WANTED: ? mol O2 DATA: 2.50 mol of NaClO3 Balance: 2 NaClO3 Bridge: SOLVE: (Since O2 ≠ NaClO3, balance and bridge.) 2 NaCl + 3 O2 3 mol O2 = 2 mol NaClO3 3 mol O2 ? mol O2 = 2.50 mol NaClO3 • = 3.75 mol O2 2 mol NaClO3 ***** Lesson 10E: Conversion Stoichiometry Perhaps the most frequently encountered type of chemistry calculation is stoichiometry (stoy-kee-AHM-et-ree), a term derived from ancient Greek that means “measuring fundamental quantities.” In stoichiometry, you are given a measured quantity of one substance and WANT to know how much of another substance will react or form. Stoichiometry is a reaction calculation in which the coefficients of the balanced equation must be used to convert from measures of one substance to measures of another. Our system for solving stoichiometry will be The 7 Stoichiometry Steps 1. Write: “WANTED: ? unit and substance formula.” 2. List the DATA, including prompts. For a chemical reaction calculation, if the WANTED substance ≠ given substance, 3. Balance the equation. 4. Bridge: Write the mole-to-mole relationship between the WANTED and given formulas, using the coefficients of the balanced equation. 5. To SOLVE, first write “? WANTED unit and substance = # unit of given substance,” then convert to moles of the given substance. 6. Then convert to moles of WANTED substance, using the bridge conversion. 7. Then convert to the unit WANTED. With practice, these steps will become automatic. The short version of the 7 steps (which should be memorized) is the Stoichiometry 7-Step Prompt: For reactions, if WANTED substance ≠ given substance, • Write 4 steps to gather tools: WANTED and DATA, balance and bridge (WDBB), and • 3 to solve: Convert “? WANTED = unit given” to mol given to mol wanted to unit wanted. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 215 Module 10 – Stoichiometry The stoichiometry steps use the conversion method with a mole-to-mole bridge conversion. The coefficients of the balanced equation supply the key bridge ratio. That bridge will convert units of the given substance to units of the WANTED substance. In your notebook, solve the following problem with the 7 stoichiometry steps, then check your answer below. Q. Sodium burns to form sodium oxide (Na2O). How many grams of Na2O can be produced from 2.30 grams of Na? The unbalanced equation is Na + O2 Na 2 O ***** 1. WANT: ? g Na2O (a single unit is WANTED) 2. DATA: 2.30 g Na (only single unit in DATA—use as given) 1 mol Na = 23.0 g Na (g Na in DATA = grams prompt) 1 mol Na2O = 62.0 g Na2O (g Na2O WANTED = grams prompt) (Since this is a reaction and the WANTED and given substances differ, use the 7 stoichiometry steps.) 3. Balance: 4 Na + O2 4. Bridge: 4 mol Na = 2 mol Na2O 2 Na2O (moles WANTED to moles given) If needed, adjust your work and finish. ***** 5. SOLVE. Write “? WANTED = given” ? g Na2O = 2.30 g Na Then convert to moles given. (“Grams to moles – use molar mass.”) When a single unit is WANTED, use single unit DATA as a given (Lesson 5D). ? g Na2O = 2.30 g Na • 1 mol Na • 23.0 g Na mol Na 6. Convert to moles WANTED using the bridge between given and WANTED. ? g Na2O = 2.30 g Na • 1 mol Na 23.0 g Na • 2 mol Na2O• 4 mol Na mol Na2O 7. Convert to units WANTED. ? g Na2O = 2.30 g Na • 1 mol Na • 2 mol Na2O • 62.0 g Na2O = 23.0 g Na = 2.30 • 2 • 62.0 g Na2O = 4 mol Na 1 mol Na2O 3.10 g Na2O 23.0 • 4 (SF: Coefficients and 1 are always exact, 2.30 and 23.0 have 3 sf, round answer to 3 sf.) © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 216 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Note the order of the units on the top in your multiplied conversions: units given, moles given, moles WANTED, units WANTED. Note also the mol-to-mol bridge conversion that is needed in all reaction calculations when the WANTED substance formula differs from the given formula. ***** Units and Substance Formulas: Inseparable In solving problems involving chemical reactions, always write the number, the unit, and the substance formula in each term in your WANTED, DATA, and conversions. One reason to write number, unit, formula is to avoid errors in unit cancellation. • Units measuring one substance cannot cancel the same units measuring a different substance. Example: 32 grams NaOH • 1 mole HCl 36.5 grams HCl Is this conversion legal or illegal? Write your answer, then check below. ***** Illegal. Since grams of NaOH are not the same as grams of HCl, the units cannot cancel. The substance is an inseparable part of the unit. Is this conversion legal or illegal? 32 g NaOH • 1 kg 1000 g = 0.032 kg NaOH ***** Legal, since different formulas are not canceled. The ratio between grams and kilograms is true for all measurements. When problems involve several formulas, writing the substance formulas after the units for all quantities in the WANTED and DATA is essential to avoid errors. • If a substance formula is known, it is a part of the unit, it must be written, and the unit cannot be cancelled in conversions unless the formula attached also cancels. Writing the formulas also keeps straight which molar mass numbers to put where. In the previous problem, the 62.0 g applies to the Na2O, not the Na. Practice In your problem notebook, do each of these. Use a table of atomic masses. 1. Multiply these terms. Label the answers completely. a. 5.1 grams Al2O3 • 1 mole Al2O3 • 3 mole O2 = 102 g Al2O3 4 mole Al2O3 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 217 Module 10 – Stoichiometry b. 1.27 x 10─3 g Cu • 1 mol Cu • 2 mol Ag • 107.9 g Ag = 63.5 g Cu 1 mol Cu 1 mol Ag 2. Phosphorus, (P4) burns in air (O2) to form the oxide P4O10 a. Write the balanced equation for the reaction. b. How many moles of O2 are needed to burn 7.0 moles of P4? c. How many grams of P4O10 would be produced when 0.500 mole of P4 burns? Why Not Go from Grams to Grams In One Conversion? In reaction calculations, to go from grams given to grams WANTED, we first convert grams to moles. Why don’t we solve in one conversion, using a gram/gram ratio? The reason is: the gram to gram ratios are not quick and easy to calculate. In a reaction, if the substance formulas are known, the particle ratios are easy to determine. Simply balance the equation. The coefficients then supply exact and simple whole-number relationships for the numbers of particles that react and form, in units of particles or moles of particles. There is no similar easy way to calculate the gram-to-gram ratios for a chemical reaction. In reaction calculations, we do the steps we do, in the order we do, so we can use the mole to mole bridge -- the only bridge between the given and WANTED substances that is easy to determine. To summarize: In reaction calculations using visible amounts of reactants, the bridge from the given to WANTED substance is a mole to mole conversion. The Stoichiometry Bridge: Moles to Moles Grams A Grams B Moles of A Moles B Moles A Moles of B Flashcards Put a check by the questions below that you can answer quickly and correctly. Make flashcards for those you cannot. Run these cards until you can do them perfectly, then try the problems below. Save a few problems, then for your next study session, run the cards again and then finish the practice. Run the cards until you know each one for 3 sessions in a row, then add them to stack 2. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 218 Module 10 – Stoichiometry One-way cards (with notch). Questions: Back Side -- Answers Coefficients can be read as Molecules, or moles of molecules When is a mol/mol conversion needed in conversions? If WANTED formula # given formula When are the stoichiometry steps needed? If WANTED formula # given formula What numbers go into a mol/mol conversion? The coefficients of the balanced equation. In stoichiometry, convert the unit given to mol given to mol wanted to unit wanted Recite the 7 steps to solve stoichiometry for a WANTED single unit Wanted and Data, Balance and Bridge Convert units to moles to moles to units Practice B Use a table of atomic masses. Do problems 1 and 2a now. Save the rest for your next practice session. 1. For the reaction FeS + O2 a. Balance the equation. Fe2O3 + SO2 b. Starting with 0.48 moles of FeS and plenty of oxygen, how many grams of Fe2O3 can be formed? (Molar masses: iron = 55.8 g/mol, oxygen = 16.0 g/mol) 2. Nitrogen dioxide reacts with water to form nitric acid and nitric oxide. The balanced equation is 2 HNO3 + NO 3 NO2 + H2O a. How many moles of H2O are required to react with 2.3 kilograms of NO2? b. How many milligrams of NO can be made from 2.4 x 1021 molecules of NO2? 3. Silver reacts with nitric acid in this balanced reaction equation: Ag + 2 HNO3 NO2 + AgNO3 + H2O a. How many grams of nitric acid are required to use up 5.00 g Ag? b. How many grams of nitrogen dioxide would be formed? ANSWERS Practice A b. 4.32 x 10─3 g Ag 1. a. 0.038 mol O2 2b. 1. WANTED: 1 P4O10 ? mol O2 2. DATA: 2a. 1 P4 + 5 O2 7.0 mol P4 (For reaction calculations, if WANTED ≠ given, use the 7 stoichiometry steps.) 3. Balance. (See Part A above) © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 219 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 4. Bridge: 1 mol P4 = 5 mol O2 5. SOLVE: (Begin with) ? mol O2 = 7.0 mol P4 • _______________ mol P4 ***** 6-7. (Convert unit given to moles given to moles WANTED to unit WANTED Here, the given and WANTED units are moles. Use the one conversion in the DATA to solve.) ? mol O2 = 7.0 mol P4 • 5 mol O2 = 35 mol O2 1 mol P4 1. WANTED: ? g P4O10 2. DATA: c. 0.500 mol P4 (WANT single unit) (Use single unit as given) 1 mol P4O10 = 284.0 g P4O10 (grams prompt) (For a reaction calculation, if WANTED ≠ given, use the 7 stoichiometry steps.) 3. Balance. 1 P4 + 5 O2 4. Bridge. 1 mol P4 = 1 mol P4O10 1 P4O10 ***** 5-7. SOLVE. (? WANTED = Unit given to moles given to moles WANTED to unit WANTED. Here, moles are given. Chain the two DATA conversions to solve.) ? g P4O10 = 0.500 mol P4 • 1 mol P4O10 • 284.0 g P4O10 = 1 mol P4 1 mol P4O10 142 g P4O10 (SF: 0.500 has 3 sf and 1 is exact, so the answer must be rounded to 3 sf.) Practice B 1 a. 4 FeS + 7 O2 b. 1. WANT: 2. DATA: 2 Fe2O3 + 4 SO2 ? g Fe2O3 0.48 mol FeS 1 mol Fe2O3 = 159.6 g Fe2O3 (grams prompt) (A reaction calculation and WANTED ≠ given. Use the 7 stoichiometry steps.) 4. Bridge: 4 mol FeS = 2 mol Fe2O3 3. Balance: (see Part A) 5. SOLVE: (Write ? WANTED = given. Convert to given moles is not needed. Moles was given) ***** 6. To moles WANTED, via the bridge. 7. To units WANTED.) ? g Fe2O3 = 0.48 mol FeS • 2 mol Fe2O3 • 159.6 g Fe2O3 = 38 g Fe2O3 4 mol FeS 1 mol Fe2O3 ^Step 5 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 ^Step 6 ^Step 7 Page 220 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 2. a. 1. WANT: 2. DATA: ? mol H2O 2.3 kg NO2 (kg = grams prompt) 1 mol NO2 = 46.0 g NO2 (A reaction calculation. WANTED substance ≠ given substance. Use 7 stoichiometry steps.) 3. Balance. 3 NO2 + H2O 4. Bridge. 3 mol NO2 = 1 mol H2O 2 HNO3 + NO ***** 5-7. Solve. (? WANTED = unit given to mole given to mole WANTED to unit WANTED.) ? mol H2O = 2.3 kg NO2 • 103 g • 1 mol NO2 • 1 mol H2O 1 kg 46.0 g NO2 3 mol NO2 b. 1. WANT: ? mg N O 2. DATA: 2.4 x 1021 molecules of NO2 = 17 mol H2O (only single unit in DATA = given) (Avogadro prompt) 1 mol = 6.02 x 1023 molecules 1 mol NO = 30.0 g NO (g, mg, kg of formula = grams prompt) (WANTED substance ≠ given substance. A reaction calculation. Use stoichiometry steps.) 3. Balance. 3 NO2 + H2O 2 HNO3 + NO 4. Bridge. 1 mol NO = 4 mol NO2 ***** 5-7. SOLVE. (? WANTED = Unit given to mol given to mol WANTED to unit WANTED.) 1 mol NO2 ? mg NO = 2.4 x 1021 NO2 • • 1 mol NO • 30.0 g NO • 6.02 x 1023 NO2 3. a. 3 mol NO2 1 mol NO 1 mg = 40. mg NO 10─3 g 1. WANT: ? g HNO3 (Nitric acid is what Ag reacts with. Reactants are on the left.) 2. DATA: 5.00 g Ag (WANT a single unit; this is your single unit given) 1 mol Ag = 107.9 g Ag 1 mol HNO3 = 63.0 g HNO3 3. Balance. (supplied) 4. Bridge. 1 mol Ag = 2 mol HNO3 5-7. SOLVE. ? g HNO3 = 5.00 g Ag • 1 mol Ag • 2 mol HNO3 • 63.0 g HNO3 = 107.9 g Ag 1 mol Ag 1 mol HNO3 b. 1. WANT: 2. DATA: 5.84 g HNO3 ? g NO 2 5.00 g Ag ; © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 1 mol Ag 107.9 g Ag ; 1 mol NO2 46.0 g NO2 (list DATA as equalities or conversions) Page 221 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 4. Bridge; 1 mol Ag = 1 mol NO2 5-7. SOLVE. ? g NO2 = 5.00 g Ag • 1 mol Ag • 1 mol NO2 • 46.0 g NO2 107.9 g Ag 1 mol Ag 1 mol NO2 = 2.13 g NO2 ***** Lesson 10F: Percent Yield Prerequisites: Before this lesson, complete Lesson 10E. ***** Actual versus Theoretical Yield A primary goal of chemical reactions is to take substances of low value to society and convert them, using chemical reactions, to medicines, fertilizers, computer chips, and other materials that raise our standard of living. In most cases, however, the amount of product we are able to recover after a reaction is less than the amount predicted by stoichiometry. Factors that reduce the actual yield include • difficulty in separating a wanted product from other products and left-over reactants, and • reactions that do not go to completion. An amount of product that is calculated by stoichiometry to form is the theoretical yield: how much product we would get if the reaction goes 100% and we are able to isolate in a pure form all of the product we are seeking. The percent yield is a measure of our efficiency at recovering products. Percent yield compares how much product stoichiometry predicts will form to how much is actually obtained from the reaction. The definition equation is Percent Yield = actual yield Theoretical yield x 100% In the fraction, the top and bottom terms must have the same units and formulas. In the lab, an actual percent yield can be at most 100%, and is nearly always less than 100%. In percent calculations, our rule (from Lesson 9A) is “work in fractions, not percents.” The yield fraction equation is Yield Fraction = actual yield Theoretical yield Recall that Percent = fraction x 100% and = amount of product actually formed amount predicted by stoichiometry fraction = percent/100% Commit to long-term memory both the yield fraction equation and what its terms mean. Yield calculations are easier to solve using equations than conversions. To simplify solving equations, use these steps. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 222 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Solving Problems Using Equations 1. Write the unit and substance formula WANTED. 2. From memory, write the equation that is used to solve. 3. Make a DATA table that contains each term or symbol in the equation. 4. Add the problem’s DATA after each term or symbol. 5. Solve the equation for the WANTED term using the terms or symbols first; then 6. Substitute the DATA from the table and complete the math. Apply those steps to the following example. Other ways to solve this simple problem may be faster, but our goal at this point is to learn the steps. These steps have the advantage of being able to solve both easy and difficult problems. Using these steps, you will know how to solve nearly all math equation calculations by applying the same steps. Q1. A reaction that produces 6.8 grams of aspirin has a 72% yield. What mass of aspirin was predicted by stoichiometry to form? ***** WANT: ? g aspirin theoretical (stoichiometry predicts theoretical yields) When a percent is involved, use the fraction equation. Yield Fraction = DATA: actual yield Theoretical yield Yield Fraction = 72%/100% = 0.72 Actual yield = 6.8 g aspirin Theoretical yield = ? g aspirin SOLVE: (actual and theoretical units must match) Solve the memorized equation for the WANTED term in symbols or terms first. Theoretical yield = actual yield = 6.8 g aspirin = 9.4 g aspirin theoretical Yield fraction 0.72 In more typical calculations, you will need to solve stoichiometry to find a percent yield. With that hint, try this problem, but use the same equation steps as above. Q2. A reaction of 0.100 moles of lead nitrate with excess potassium chloride produces 15.0 grams of lead chloride. The unbalanced equation is Pb(NO3)2 + KCl PbCl2 + KNO3 What is the percent yield for this reaction? ***** WANT: % yield PbCl2 (Yield measures products. The product measured is PbCl2 ) When a percent is involved, first write and solve the fraction equation. Yield Fraction = DATA: actual yield Theoretical yield Yield Fraction = ? Actual yield = 15.0 g PbCl2 © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 223 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Theoretical yield = ? g PbCl2 Using algebra, we can solve an equation that has one unknown, but not two. We need to fill in one of those two ? terms before we can solve the equation. Which term can we calculate from what we know? ***** Stoichiometry is a tool that predicts theoretical yield. Apply the 7 stoichiometry steps. ***** Stoichiometry starts with WDBB. 1. WANT: ? g PbCl2 theoretical 2. DATA: 0.100 moles Pb(NO3)2 (a single unit is WANTED) (only single unit in DATA—use as given) 1 mol PbCl2 = 278.1 g PbCl2 (grams prompt) One tricky point: the actual amount of PbCl2 in the problem has no role in stoichiometry to find the theoretical amount of PbCl2 formed, so that the 15.0 g PbCl2 actual is not data that used in this part of the problem. 3. Balance: 4. Bridge: 1 Pb(NO3)2 + 2 KCl 1 PbCl2 + 2 KNO3 (moles WANTED to moles given) 1 mol Pb(NO3)2 = 1 mol PbCl2 If needed, adjust your work and finish. ***** 5. SOLVE. • 278.1 g PbCl2 = ? g PbCl2 theoretical = 0.100 mol Pb(NO3)2 • 1 mol PbCl2 1 mol Pb(NO3)2 = 27.8 g PbCl2 1 mol PbCl2 = the theoretical yield Add this answer to the DATA table for the yield fraction and complete the problem. ***** DATA: Yield Fraction = ? Actual yield = 15.0 g PbCl2 Theoretical yield = 27.8 g PbCl2 Now we have an equation with one unknown, so we can SOLVE for ?: ***** Yield Fraction = actual yield = Theoretical yield 15.0 g PbCl2 = 0.540 27.8 g PbCl2 But what was WANTED? ***** Percent yield = fraction x 100% = 0.540 x 100% = 54.0% © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 224 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Practice: Memorize the yield fraction equation first, then do one problem now. Save the other for your next practice session. 1. In the blast furnace process used to make iron and steel, one step in the production of iron from the iron ore magnetite, Fe3O4 , is this reaction: Fe3O4 + 4 CO 3 Fe + 4 CO2 To produce 850 kilograms of iron as an actual yield, if the percent yield of the process is 92%, how many moles of magnetite must be reacted? 2. For the conversion of the iron ore hematite ( Fe2O3 ) to iron in a blast furnace, one step is this unbalanced equation: Fe2O3 + CO Fe + CO2 If 275 moles of hematite is reacted and the process has a 95% yield, how many kilograms of iron will be formed? ANSWERS 1. WANT: ? mol Fe3O4 When a percent yield is involved, first write the yield fraction equation. Yield Fraction = actual yield Theoretical yield by stoich. Strategy: When an equation and stoichiometry are both needed to solve a problem, the question is: Which part should be done first? See which part you have enough DATA to solve. Let’s try the equation DATA table first. DATA: Yield Fraction = 92% / 100% = 0.92 Actual yield = 850 kg Fe Theoretical yield = ? kg Fe (the two terms in the fraction must have the same units) Using algebra, we can solve an equation with one unknown term. Do so. ***** SOLVE: Solve in symbols or terms first. Theoretical yield = actual yield = 850 kg Fe = 924 kg Fe predicted by stoichiometry Yield fraction 0.92 It is an option to carry an extra sf until the end of a multi-step calculation. Stoichiometry predicts the theoretical amount of product that can be formed. If needed, adjust and finish. ***** Recite repeatedly to retain: “Stoichiometry starts with WDBB.” 1. WANT: ? mol Fe3O4 initial 2. DATA: 924 kg Fe predicted 1 mol Fe = 55.8 g Fe (a single unit is WANTED) (only single unit in DATA—use as given) ( kg is a grams prompt) 3. Balance: above © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 225 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 4. Bridge: 1 mol Fe3O4 = 3 mol Fe 5. SOLVE. ? mol Fe3O4 = 924 kg Fe • 1,000 g • 1 mol Fe • 1 mol Fe3O4 1 kg 55.8 g Fe 3 mol Fe The original data had 2 sf. 2. WANT: = 5.5 x 103 mol Fe3O4 ? kg Fe actual yield It helps to label the WANTED and DATA with the terms that are used in the equation. When a percent yield is involved, first write the yield fraction equation. Yield Fraction = actual yield Theoretical yield Strategy: Which part should be done first: the equation or stoichiometry? See which part you have enough DATA to solve. Try the equation DATA table first. DATA: Yield Fraction = 95% / 100% = 0.95 Actual yield = ? kg Fe Theoretical yield = ? kg Fe (the two terms in the fraction must have the same units) The yield must be a product of the reaction. This data does not supply a yield amount. But, the data does supply an initial amount of reactant and a balanced equation. Using stoichiometry, we can calculate the theoretical yield needed in the equation data table above. Start there. ***** Stoichiometry starts with WDBB. 1. WANT: ? kg Fe theoretical yield 2. DATA: (a single unit is WANTED) 275 mol Fe2O3 (only single unit in DATA—use as given) 1 mol Fe = 55.8 g Fe 3. Balance: 1 Fe2O3 + 3 CO 4. Bridge: ( kg is a grams prompt) 2 Fe + 3 CO2 1 mol Fe2O3 = 2 mol Fe 5. SOLVE. ? kg Fe theor. = 275 mol Fe2O3 • 2 mol Fe • 55.8 g Fe mol • 1 kg = 30.7 kg Fe theoretical 1 mol Fe2O3 1 mol Fe 103 g See if the yield fraction can now be solved. ***** DATA: Yield Fraction = 95% / 100% = 0.95 Actual yield = ? kg Fe Theoretical yield = 30.7 kg Fe SOLVE: Solve the yield fraction equation in symbols or terms first. Actual yield = ( Yield fraction ) ( theoretical yield ) = ( 0.95 ) ( 30.7 kg Fe ) = 29 kg Fe actual ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 226 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Lesson 10G: Finding the Limiting Reactant Prerequisites: Before this lesson, complete Lesson 10E on stoichiometry. ***** Determining the Amounts of the Products At this point in our study, we will limit our consideration to reactions that go to completion: those that continue until one reactant is essentially 100% used up. A reactant that is ~100% used up (~ means approximately) is termed a limiting reactant (or limiting reagent): it limits both how much of the other reactants are used up and how much of the products form. Which reactant is used up first depends on • the starting amounts of each reactant, and • the ratios of reaction for the reactants (the reactant coefficients). If a reactant is not ~100% used up in a reaction, it is said to be in excess, meaning • enough is present to use up all of the limiting reactant; and • some amount remains when the reaction stops. In calculations for reactions that go to completion, key rules include • One or more reactants must be limiting (totally used up); • The initial amount of the limiting reactant determines how much of the other reactants react and products form. • The initial amount of the limiting reactant must be used as the given to calculate how much of the other reactants react and products form. • the amounts of reactants in excess do not determine how much of other reactants are used up or products form. The amount of a reactant in excess cannot be used as a given to calculate how much of the products form. • If a reactant is in excess, its amount is “enough to use up the limiting reactant” and measurements of its amount are not necessary. Write your answers to the following question based on “numbers in your head” rather than written conversions, then check below. Q. Given the balanced equation 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O , if 10 molecules of H2 are ignited with 6 molecules of O2 , and the reaction goes to completion, a. which reactant is limiting? b. How much H2O can be formed? c. How much of each reactant and product is present in the mixture at the end of the reaction? ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 227 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Answer a. For the 6 molecules of O2 to react, they would use up 12 molecules of H2. We don’t have that much H2 , so the H2 is limiting. Though H2 particles are initially present in a higher count, its amount runs out first, preventing all of the O2 from being used up. Looked at another way: Reacting 10 molecules of H2 requires 5 molecules O2. We have that much O2 , so when we use up all of the H2 , some O2 remains. The H2 is therefore limiting (used up ~100%), and there is excess O2 : some remains in the mixture at the end of the reaction. b. If 10 molecules of H2 are used up, according to the balanced equation, 10 molecules of H2O must form. Because some O2 remains at the end of the reaction, the 6 molecules of O2 initially present do not determine how much H2O forms. Only the amounts of reactant that react determine the products that form. The initial amount of limiting reactant predicts the amounts of all products that form. c. In the mixture after the reaction is no H2 . Present are the 10 molecules of water formed, plus the 1 molecule of O2 that did not react. Practice A: Do these in your head. Answers are at the end of this lesson. Use the balanced equation 2 H2 + O2 2 H2O to answer these questions. 1. To form 8 molecules of H2O , a. How much H2 is needed? b. How much O2 is needed? 2. How much H2O are produced when 7 molecules of O2 is used up? 3. If 20 molecules of H2 is mixed with 20 molecules of O2 and the reaction goes to completion, a. The H2 uses up how much O2 as it reacts? b. How much H2O is formed? c. How much O2 is left over? d. Which reactant is in excess? e. Which reactant is limiting? Stoichiometric Equivalents If one reactant is mixed with another, and both exactly and completely use each other up in the reaction, the reactants are said to be stoichiometrically equivalent, and they are present in stoichiometric amounts. If two reactants are mixed in stoichiometric amounts, both are limiting, and the amounts of either reactant can be used as a given to calculate the amounts of product that form. In some reaction calculations, you are asked to find a stoichiometric equivalent: the amount of one reactant that is needed to exactly use up another reactant. For a given amount of one reactant, the calculation of the WANTED stoichiometrically equivalent amount of a second reactant can be found by standard 7-step stoichiometry. Several problems in Lesson 9E were this type of problem, with one reactant given and the amount of another reactant needed to use the given up WANTED. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 228 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Identifying the Limiting Reactant So far, for reactions that go to completion, we have learned to solve three types of reaction amount calculations (stoichiometry). 1. Given a known count of particles for one (limiting) reactant, and excess amounts of the other reactants, how much of the products can be formed? 2. Given a known count of particles for one reactant, how much of a second reactant is the stoichiometric equivalent needed to exactly and completely use up the first? In both types of problems above, • an amount for only one substance is identified, and it is used as a given, and • to solve, the preferred method is 7-step stoichiometry. A third type of problem was encountered above in this lesson. 3. Amounts of two or more reactants are supplied, but the reactant that is limiting is not specified. To find the amounts of products that form, you must first find which reactant is limiting. If the particle counts and the reaction ratios are simple, you can often identify the limiting reactant by inspection, as has been done so far in this lesson. To find which reactant is limiting in more complex cases, we will learn two methods. The first method we will term Identifying the Limiting Reactant by Successive Conversions 1. If a calculation supplies the grams or counts of two or more reactants and asks for amounts that form of one or more products, the limiting reactant must be identified. To do so, a. In successive calculations, use 7-step stoichiometry to calculate the WANTED amount of one of the products. b. In each conversion calculation, find the same WANTED unit and product formula, but use a different supplied reactant amount as a given. c. The calculation that results in the lowest amount of the WANTED substance formed has the limiting reactant as its given. Label this reactant as a limiting reactant. The logic is: you cannot form more product than can be made from the reactant that is used up first in the reaction. The reactant used up first is therefore the reactant that forms the least amount of product. The limiting reactant is the one that most limits how much of the products you can form. When the reactant that is limiting is used up, the reaction must stop. d. If two reactants are stoichiometrically equivalent, both are limiting, and the amounts supplied of either reactant can be used to calculate the amounts of the products that will form. 2. The conversions above calculate how much of one of the WANTED products will form. If you are asked to calculate the amounts of other products that also form, base your answer on stoichiometry conversions with the supplied amount of the same limiting © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 229 Module 10 – Stoichiometry reactant as given. A limiting reactant determines how much of each of the products form. Apply the rules above to the following example, and then check your answer below. Q. If 2.00 g H2 gas and 4.80 g O2 gas are mixed and ignited, how many grams of water will form? ***** In reaction calculations, start with WDBB. 1. WANT: ? g H2O 2. DATA: (a single unit is WANTED) 2.00 g H2 4.80 g O2 1 mol H2 = 2.016 g H2 1 mol O2 = 32.0 g O2 1 mol H2O = 18.0 g H2O (there are 3 grams prompts) Strategy: If a single-unit amount of one or more products is WANTED, and the data includes grams or counts of two reactants, you will need to identify a limiting reactant first. To do so, calculate the WANTED amount using the 7 stoichiometry steps successively, starting from the given amount supplied of each reactant. 3. Balance: 2 H2 + 1 O2 4. Bridge: (moles WANTED to moles given conversion will vary for the two givens.) 2 H2O If needed, adjust your work and finish. ***** 5. SOLVE. ? g H2O = 2.00 g H2 • 1 mol H2 • 2 mol H2O • 18.0 g H2O = 17.9 g H2O 2.016 g H2 2 mol H2 1 mol H2O ? g H2O = 4.80 g O2 • 1 mol O2 • 2 mol H2O • 18.0 g H2O = 5.40 g H2O 32.0 g O2 1 mol O2 1 mol H2O In each calculation, the given amount of one reactant is used up, and the amount of one product that would form is determined. The lowest answer shows the amount of product that is made at the point when the limiting reactant is 100% used up. The reactant used up first, at the lowest amount of product formed, is limiting because when it is gone, the reaction must stop. The limiting reactant is the one that most limits the amount of products that can form. For the above reaction, the limiting reactant must be O2 . The amount of water that forms must be 5.40 g H2O . Though more grams of oxygen gas are supplied, the oxygen is used up first. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 230 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Summary: Rules For Limiting Reactants 1. If a reaction goes to completion, at least one reactant is limiting: it is used up ~100%. 2. To calculate how much of any other reactants react or products form, you must start from an amount of a limiting reactant as given. 3. In calculations, the amounts of reactants in excess (reactant substances not used up 100%) cannot be used to predict the amounts of products that form. In calculations, the amount of the reactant in excess can be ignored. 4. When two reactants exactly and completely use each other up in a reaction, both are limiting, and their amounts are said to be stoichiometrically equivalent. 5. If an amount of one reactant is given, and you want to find how much of a second reactant is needed to exactly use up the first, what is WANTED is the stoichiometric equivalent amount of the second reactant, and you solve by 7-step stoichiometry. 6. If an amount of a product is WANTED, and two or more single-unit reactant amounts are in the DATA, you will need to identify a limiting reactant. 7. To identify the limiting reactant by successive conversions: Do separate 7-step stoichiometry that has the same product WANTED but the different supplied reactant amounts as given. The maximum amount of product that can form is the lowest amount of product that results from those calculations. The given reactant that converts to the lowest amount of product formed is the limiting reactant. Practice B: Learn the rules and terms above, then do Problem 2. If you need more practice, do problem 1. 1. For the reaction represented by the following unbalanced equation H2 + Cl2 HCl If 14.2 grams of chlorine gas is reacted with 0.300 moles of hydrogen gas, a. how many moles of hydrogen chloride can be formed? b. How many moles of the reactant in excess is stoichiometrically equivalent to the limiting reactant? 2. For the following unbalanced reaction equation H2SO4 + NaOH H2O + Na2SO4 If 2.00 grams of NaOH is reacted with 0.0100 moles of H2SO4, a. how many grams of water can be formed? b. How many grams of the reactant in excess is stoichiometrically equivalent to the limiting reactant? © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 231 Module 10 – Stoichiometry © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 232 Module 10 – Stoichiometry ANSWERS Practice A 1a. 8 molecules H2 needed 3a. 10 molecules O2 3d. O2 is in excess 1b. 4 molecules O2 needed 3b. 20 molecules H2O 2. 14 molecules H2O 3c. 10 molecules O2 left over 3e. H2 is limiting. Practice B 1a. In reaction amount calculations (stoichiometry), start with WDBB. 1. WANT: ? mol HCl 2. DATA: (a single unit is WANTED) 14.2 g Cl2 0.300 mol H2 1 mol Cl2 = 71.0 g Cl2 (Strategy: Since the data includes single-unit grams or counts of two reactants, you must identify the limiting reactant to find the amount of product that will form. Find the WANTED amount using the 7 stoichiometry steps for both reactant amounts.) 3. Balance: 1 H2 + 4. Bridge: 5. SOLVE: 1 Cl2 2 HCl (moles WANTED to moles given will vary for the two givens.) ? mol HCl = 14.2 g Cl2 • 1 mol Cl2 • 71.0 g Cl2 2 mol HCl = 0.400 mol HCl 1 mol Cl2 ? mol HCl = 0.300 mol H2 • 2 mol HCl 1 mol H2 = 0.600 mol HCl The limiting reactant is the one that most limits the amount of products that can form. The reactant that is limiting decides how much product can form. The limiting reactant must be Cl2 . When 0.400 mol HCl forms, the reaction stops. 1b. In reaction amount calculations (stoichiometry), start with WDBB. 1. WANT: 2. DATA: (From part a, H2 is the reactant in excess) ? mol H2 14.2 g Cl2 (the given is the known amount of the limiting reactant) 1 mol Cl2 = 71.0 g Cl2 To calculate the amount of a stoichiometric equivalent, use standard conversion stoichiometry. 3. Balance: 1 H2 + 1 Cl2 4. Bridge: 5. SOLVE: 2 HCl 1 mol H2 = 1 mol Cl2 ? mol H2 = 14.2 g Cl2 • 1 mol Cl2 • 71.0 g Cl2 1 mol H2 = 0.200 mol H2 1 mol Cl2 This answer makes sense. You started with 0.300 mol H2. You use up 0.200 mol H2 in the reaction with the Cl2 . This confirms that H2 is in excess: some is left over at the end. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 233 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 2a. In reaction amount calculations, start with WDBB. 1. WANT: ? g H2O 2. DATA: 2.00 g NaOH 0.0100 mol H2SO4 1 mol NaOH = 40.0 g NaOH 1 mol H2O = 18.0 g H2O (2 grams prompts) (Strategy: Since the data includes single-unit grams or counts of two reactants, you must identify the limiting reactant. Find the WANTED amount using 7-step stoichiometry with both reactant amounts as given.) 3. Balance: 1 H2SO4 + 2 NaOH 2 H2O + 1 Na2SO4 4. Bridge: (moles WANTED to moles given will vary for the two givens.) 5. SOLVE: ? g H2O = 2.00 g NaOH • 1 mol NaOH • 2 mol H2O • 18.0 g H2O = 0.900 g H2O 40.0 g NaOH 2 mol NaOH 1 mol H2O ? g H2O = 0.0100 mol H2SO4 • 2 mol H2O • 18.0 g H2O = 0.360 g H O 2 1 mol H2SO4 1 mol H2O The limiting reactant is the one that most limits the amount of product that can form. The reactant that is limiting decides how much product can form. For the amounts mixed in this reaction, the limiting reactant is H2SO4 . The mass of water formed is decided based on the limiting reactant: 0.360 g H2O . 2b. In reaction amount calculations, start with WDBB. The calculation of a stoichiometrically equivalent amount is standard 7-step stoichiometry because the given amount is known. 1 WANT: 2. DATA: ? g NaOH (NaOH is the reactant in excess) 0.0100 mol H2SO4 3. Balance: 1 H2SO4 + 2 NaOH (the given is the amount of the limiting reactant) 2 H2O + 1 Na2SO4 4. Bridge: 1 mol H2SO4 = 2 mol NaOH (stoichiometric equivalents are always two reactants.) 5. SOLVE: ? g NaOH = 0.0100 mol H2SO4 • 2 mol NaOH • 40.0 g NaOH = 0.800 g NaOH 1 mol H2SO4 1 mol NaOH This answer makes sense. You started with 2.00 g NaOH. You use up 0.800 g NaOH in the reaction with the H2SO4 . This confirms that NaOH is in excess: some is left over at the end. ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 234 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Lesson 10H: Final Reaction Mixtures – and RICE Tables Timing: Complete this lesson if you are asked to complete problems that calculate the total amounts of reactants and products present at the end of a reaction, or if you are asked to complete amounts tables or ICE tables or RICE tables at this point in your course. ***** A Chemistry Accounting System So far, for reactions that go to completion, we have learned to calculate 1. Amounts of products that form when the limiting reactant is identified; 2. The amount of a second reactant that is needed to exactly use up (is stoichiometrically equivalent to) a known amount of another reactant; and 3. Given amounts of more than one reactant, how to identify the limiting reactant that decides how much of the products form. In each of these types of calculations, the preferred method to solve is 7-step stoichiometry. The method you are about to learn can be used to organize the results of conversion stoichiometry. It can also be used to solve any type of reaction amount (stoichiometry) calculation, even for reactions that do not go to completion. This method is especially useful in problems that ask you to find the amounts of all of the reactants and products that are present at the end of a reaction, but it can help to organize your work in any reaction calculation that is complex or confusing. In problems that involve lots of numbers, it is helpful to have an accounting system to organize your work. Let’s learn the logic of a “chemistry accounting system” with a nonchemistry example. Q1. A chemistry lab assistant is filling lab drawers. Into each top drawer is placed one Bunsen burner, two test tube racks, and 20 test tubes. From the initial inventory of 120 burners, 220 racks, and 3,000 test tubes, as many drawers are filled as possible. How many drawers are filled? How many burners, racks, and test tubes are left over at the end of the process? To solve, complete the following steps. 1. Balance this equation for the ratios of the production process. _____ Burner + _____ Racks + ____ Test Tubes = 1 Drawer 2. Fill in the boxes in the following table, then check your answer below. Reaction/Process ___ Burner ___ Racks __ Test Tubes ____ Drawer Initial Count Change (use + and ―) Present At End ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 235 Module 10 – Stoichiometry The initial data: Reaction/Process 1 Burner 2 Racks 20 Test Tubes 1 Drawer 120 220 3,000 0 Initial Count Change (use + and ―) At End Determine by trial and error: which component is used up first? ***** Because the table is intuitive, you can likely solve without a set of rules, but check to see if your answers agree with the following. Accounting Rules For the Rice Table • In the Change row, components used up are assigned negative signs, and products formed are given positive signs; • The ratios in the Change row must be the same as the ratios in the Reaction (top) row; • One End amount must be zero (or as close as possible) but no End amount can be negative (you can’t use up more than you start with). The column that has an End row zero is determined by the process ratios and trial and error. • The column with zero in the End row has the component that is limiting at the top. The count for the limiting component in the Change row is used to determine the other counts in the Change row, based on the ratios in the top row. Adjust your work if needed, then complete all of the boxes. ***** Reaction/Process 1 Burner Initial Count 2 Racks 20 Test Tubes 1 Drawer 120 0 ― 220 ― 2,200 + 110 10 At End 3,000 ― 110 Change (use + and ―) 220 0 800 110 The table displays the count of each component initially, the change in the counts of the component during the process, and the amounts present at the end of the process. The Rice-Moles Table In most respects, a chemical reaction is like any other production process: components are used up (reactants react) and new components (products) are formed. As in the above example, chemical reaction calculations are solved by counting the components. As we count eggs by the dozen, we count particles by the mole. We will call our “chemistry accounting system” a rice-moles table: rice for the labels of the rows: Reaction, Initial, Change, End and moles for the numbers that go into the table. If you can solve the Lab Drawer problem, you are prepared to solve nearly every stoichiometry calculation in chemistry. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 236 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Apply the same table logic to this chemistry example. Q2. Given the unbalanced equation H2 + O2 H2O if 16.0 moles of H2 are mixed with 6.0 moles of O2 and ignited, assuming the reaction goes to completion, find the moles of each substance present after the reaction by completing this rice-moles table. ___ H2 ___ O2 ____ H2O 2 H2 1 O2 2 H2O 16.0 mol 6.0 mol 0 mol ***** The initial data: Reaction Initial Change (use + and ―) End To start, add the balanced equation to the Reaction row. Then, using logic and the coefficients, by trial and error (and/or the accounting rules above), find which component is used up first. ***** • To use up 6.0 moles of O2 requires that 12.0 moles of H2 be used up. The O2 can be used up, because more than 12.0 moles of H2 is initially present. • Looked at another way: To use up 16.0 mol H2 requires 8.0 mol O2. For these amounts, that can’t happen: you can’t use up more O2 than the 6.0 mol present at the start, so H2 cannot be 100% used up (limiting), and O2 must be limiting. In this mixture, since the O2 is limiting (used up first), the O2 present at the end of the reaction must be zero moles. The limiting original amount of O2 that is ~100% used up determines the moles of hydrogen gas used up and water formed. If needed, adjust your table. Check that all ratios in the Change row are the same as the coefficient ratios in the Reaction row. ***** 2 H2 Reaction Initial 2 H2O 16.0 mol End v. r6 6.0 mol ― 12.0 mol ― 6.0 mol + 12.0 mol 4.0 mol Change (use + and ―) © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net 1 O2 0 mol 0 mol 12.0 mol Page 237 Module 10 – Stoichiometry The End row answers Q2, part b: In the vessel at the end of the reaction is 4.0 mol H2, no O2, and 12.0 mol H2O. A rice-moles table tracks the particle counts initially, reacting, and at the End. From those final counts, we can convert to other units WANTED. Summary: Rice-Moles Tables In a reaction calculation, to identify a limiting reactant, either successive stoichiometry or a rice-moles table may be used. If the goal is simply to identify a limiting reactant, successive stoichiometry often solves more quickly. However, • If you are asked to calculate a count of all of the particles used up, formed, and present at the end of a reaction, or • if a reaction amount calculation is complex or becomes confusing, the rice-moles table is the preferred method to organize your work. The rules in our ricemoles accounting system include a. The numbers entered into the table must have units that count particles, such as a count of the molecules or ions, or moles or millimoles of particles, or other units that are a multiple of particle counts. All numbers must have the same units. b. In the Change row, counts for reactants used up must be assigned negative signs and products formed assigned positive signs. For reactions that start as all reactants (with no products yet formed) and go to completion (conditions that you should assume are true for now unless otherwise noted), the rules below are also true. However, you don’t need to memorize them as long as you can solve rice tables intuitively. c. To identify the limiting reactant, find the column that Ends in zero by ratio trial and error among the reactants. In the End row, the count of one reactant (the limiting reactant) must be zero, and two will be zero if two reactants are stoichiometrically equivalent, but no count can be negative. d. To determine the other counts in the Change row, use a limiting reactant Change and the coefficient ratios in the top row. Practice A: Answers are at the end of this lesson. 1. Which rows in a rice-moles table must have the same ratios? Why must the ratios be the same? 2. Given the unbalanced equation: Al + Cl2 AlCl3 If 15.0 moles of Al is reacted with 15.0 moles Cl2 and the reaction goes to completion, how many moles of each component are present at the end of the reaction? Use: Reaction Initial Change (use + and ―) End © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 238 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 3. For the reaction (unbalanced) Mg + HCl MgCl2 + H2 If 0.20 moles of Mg is mixed with 0.10 moles HCl and the reaction goes to completion, what is the composition of the mixture at the end of the reaction? Finding the Limiting Reactant For Complex Mole Ratios In the rice-moles tables in the examples above, the numbers could be solved by mental arithmetic. If the Change row cannot be done “in your head,” use this rule: For a rice-moles table, if the mole-to-mole Change row cannot be completed by inspection, • use mol-to-mol conversions between the reactants to identify the limiting reactant, then • using the limiting moles as given, complete the Change row by inspection or using conversions. Let’s learn the method with an example. Q1. Given the unbalanced equation NH3 + O2 NO + H2O if 6.70 moles of NH3 are mixed with 7.20 moles of O2 and ignited, a. Use a rice table to determine how many moles of each substance are present after the reaction. b. How many grams of water are present after the reaction? Because the data does not lend itself to mental arithmetic, apply the rule in the box above. To do so this first time, in your notebook, answer these questions. 1. What is the balanced equation? 2. To use up all of the O2 , how many moles of NH3 are needed? Which is limiting? 3. To use up all of the NH3 , how many moles of O2 are needed? Which is limiting? 4. Which reactant is completely used up? ***** 1. The balanced equation: 4 NO + 6 H2O 4 NH3 + 5 O2 2. When amounts of one reactant are given, and amounts of another reactant are WANTED, use stoichiometry (mole-to-mole) conversions to solve. ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 239 Module 10 – Stoichiometry To find the moles of NH3 needed to exactly use up 7.20 mol O2: WANTED: ? mol NH3 DATA: 7.20 mol O2 Bridge: 4 mol NH3 = 5 mol O2 ? mol NH3 needed = 7.20 mol O2 reacts ● 4 mol NH3 needed = 5.76 mol NH3 needed 5 mol O2 reacts At the point when all of the initial O2 is used up, less than 6 mol NH3 is used up. Since you have more than 6 mol of NH3 available, O2 is used up before NH3. The O2 is therefore limiting and must have zero moles in the End row of the rice table. 3. When the problem supplies a count for two reactants, you may choose either reactant as your given and solve for moles of the other reactant needed. Only one mole-to-mole conversion is needed to identify which reactant is limiting. In Question 2, we chose O2 as given, and O2 was found to be limiting. Once the limiting reactant is identified, you can complete the calculations to predict how much product is formed. However, for this one calculation, Question 3 will check what the logic would be if we had chosen 6.70 mol NH3 as given. ? mol O2 needed = 6.70 mol NH3 reacts ● 5 mol O2 needed = 4 mol NH3 reacts 8.38 mol O2 needed To use up all of the NH3 would take 8.38 initial moles of O2, and we only have 7.20 initial moles of O2,so NH3 cannot be the limiting reactant. Since one reactant must be limiting, and we only have two, it must be O2 . Both calculations agree: O2 is limiting. Only one calculation is required, because once the limiting reactant is identified, its amount is used as given to complete the Change row. Now write your answer to part a of the original question. ***** Reaction 4 NH3 Initial 6.70 mol 7.20 mol ― 5.76 mol 4 NO 6 H2O -- -- ― 7.20 mol Change End 5 O2 0 mol For a limiting reactant, the amount in row 2 is always subtracted in row 3. The rest of the Change row is calculated based on the reaction coefficients, either by inspection or using mole-to-mole conversions, with the limiting moles as given. The moles NH3 used up was © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 240 Module 10 – Stoichiometry based on the given limiting O2 , as calculated in the conversions above. From the value for moles NH3 used up and the coefficients, try entering the remaining values by inspection and/or quick arithmetic. ***** Reaction 4 NH3 Initial 6.70 mol 7.20 mol ― 5.76 mol Change End 0.94 mol 4 NO 6 H2O -- -- ― 7.20 mol + 5.76 mol + 8.64 mol 0 mol + 5.76 mol + 8.64 mol 5 O2 • The moles NO formed must equal the moles NH3 used up, since their ratio is 1 to 1. • Mol H2O formed = change in mol NH3 or mol NO x 6/4 = 8.64 mol H2O The End row answers part a. Complete part b. ***** b. WANT: g H2O at end DATA: 8.64 mol H2O at end; 1 mol H2O 18.0 g H2O (g prompt in the conversion format) SOLVE: ? g H2O = 8.64 mol H2O ● 18.0 g H2O = 1 mol H2O 156 g H2O From the moles in a rice table, other WANTED units can be calculated. Practice B 1. The combustion (burning) of methanol (wood alcohol) can be described by 2 CH3OH + 3 O2 2 CO2 + 4 H2O If a mixture of 5.50 mol O2 and 2.25 mol CH3OH is ignited, how many moles of each substance is present in the mixture at the end of the reaction? Finding the Limiting Reactant When the Units Are Not Moles The units after the numbers in a rice table must all be the same. The units may be any units that the coefficients can be: particles (such as molecules or ions) or any units that are multiples of particle counts, including dozens of particles, moles of particles, or prefix-moles (such as millimoles). A rice-moles table may not be solved in grams. Why not? The ratios in the Change row are the coefficients in the Reaction row. Those coefficients can be read as particle or mole ratios, but not as mass (gram) ratios. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 241 Module 10 – Stoichiometry However, if the units supplied in a reaction calculation are not moles, the rice-moles table can be solved if the supplied units can be converted to moles. The steps are logical. 1. Convert all initial DATA to moles. 2. Solve the rice-moles table in moles. 3. Convert the End-row moles to WANTED units. Use those steps to solve this example. Q. For the reaction CH4 + 2 O2 CO2 + 2 H2O , if an initial mixture is 12.0 grams 23 molecules of O and the reaction goes to completion, of CH4 and 7.20 x 10 2 a. how many moles of CO2 form? ***** Step 1. ? mol CH4 = 12.0 g CH4 ● b. How many grams of H2O form? 1 mol CH4 = 0.750 mol CH4 16.0 g CH4 ? mol O2 = 7.20 x 1023 O2 ● Initial = 1.20 mol O2 6.02 x 1023 O2 ***** Reaction 1 mol O2 1 CH4 2 O2 0.750 mol 1 C O2 2 H2O 1.20 mol Change End Try to determine which reactant is limiting using mental arithmetic, but if unsure, do a mole-to-mole conversion between the reactants. ***** 0.750 doubled is 1.50, so 1.50 mol O2 would be needed to use up the CH4. 1.50 mol O2 doesn’t work in the table (we don’t have that much O2), so CH4 cannot be all used up (limiting). Since there are only two reactants, O2 must be limiting. Or you can reason that as 1.20 mol O2 is used up, 0.600 mol CH4 must be used up, and we have more than that much CH4, so CH4 is in excess, and O2 is used up first. From here, solve as much of the table as needed to find the WANTED units. ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 242 Module 10 – Stoichiometry The limiting moles become the given for the mole-to-mole ratios in the Change row. Since those ratios are the whole-number coefficients, the Change row can usually be filled in by inspection or quick paper and pencil arithmetic. In this reaction, the O2 to H2O ratio is 1 to 1, and the O2 to CO2 ratio is 2 to 1. A quick Change-row conversion can answer part a: a. ? mol CO2 formed = 1.20 mol limiting O2 used up ● 1/2 = 0.600 mol CO2 The moles of water formed must be the same as the moles of O2 used up. 2 O2 1 C O2 2 H2O 1.20 mol -- -- ― 1.20 mol + 0.600 mol + 1.20 mol 0 mol Initial 1 CH4 0.750 mol Reaction + 0.600 mol + 1.20 mol Change End Once moles at the End are known, other units WANTED can be calculated. Solve part b. ***** b. ? g H2O = 1.20 mol H2O ● 18.0 g H2O = 21.6 g H2O 1 mol H2O In a rice table, it may not be necessary to fill in all of the columns to find what is WANTED. When to Use Conversions, and When to Use a RICE Table? So far, we have learned two ways to solve reaction amount calculations (stoichiometry): conversions and rice tables. Which of the two methods should be used to solve a reaction calculation? Let’s adopt this simple rule. To Solve Reaction Amount Calculations, Use Which Method? If the reaction goes to completion and the given amount is clear, solve using conversion stoichiometry. In all other cases, or whenever you are not sure how to proceed, solve with a rice-moles table. This rule means that for the reaction calculations we have done so far (those involving units of grams, moles, or molecules): 1. If the limiting reactant is clear, solve with 7-step conversion stoichiometry. 2. If you are asked to find the limiting reactant, solve using a rice-moles table. 3. If you are asked to • find the mixture at the end of the reaction, or • if you are not sure whether you need to find a limiting reactant or not, or • if the data for the reaction is complicated, draw a rice-moles table. A rice table takes more time than conversions, but it works for all reaction calculations. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 243 Module 10 – Stoichiometry For a rice table, after writing the WANTED unit, DATA, and Balanced equation: • Convert all supplied units to moles to rice-moles in the table to WANTED units. SUMMARY: Reaction Amount (Stoichiometry) Calculations Both conversions and rice tables use the same fundamental steps. • For both, WDB first. List the WANTED unit, DATA with prompts, and Balance the equation. This will help to “keep your train of thought.” • If the limiting reactant is clear, write the Bridge ratio for conversion stoichiometry. If it is not, draw a rice table. Then, to solve, we use simple mole to mole ratios. Moles are the ratios we know. • Calculate the moles of the given substance(s) in the first conversion or the initial rice row. • Find the moles WANTED using coefficients: the mole to mole ratios. • Convert from the moles of WANTED substance to the final units WANTED. Flashcards Put a check by questions below that you can answer quickly; flashcard those you cannot. One-way cards (with notch). Questions: Back Side -- Answers To calculate the amount of a stoichiometric equivalent Use 7-step conversion stoichiometry Which reactant decides the amount of products that form? The limiting reactant The reactant used up first is The limiting reactant Which reactant amounts do not affect calculations? Amounts in excess (those not limiting) When should you use a rice-moles table? Whenever a reaction amount calculation is complicated In a reaction, how many reactants are limiting? At least one In a reaction, how many reactants will be in excess? All that are not limiting Given counts of two reactants, how do you identify the limiting reactant? Use successive stoichiometry or solve the rice-moles table © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 244 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Practice C: If you need to find the limiting reactant on any of these, use a rice table. Solve Problems 1, 2 and 3. Save Problem 4 for your next review session. 1. For which of the Problems 2-4 below must the limiting reactant be identified before the calculation is solved? 2. Given the unbalanced equation NH3 + O2 N O2 + H2O if 1.70 grams of NH3 are mixed with 9.60 grams of O2 and ignited, how many moles of each substance are present after the reaction? 3. Magnesium burns to form magnesium oxide (MgO). The unbalanced equation is Mg + MgO O2 How many grams of MgO can be produced by burning 0.486 kg Mg in excess oxygen? 4. Given the unbalanced equation: 10.0 grams of each reactant, CS2 + O2 C O2 + SO2 , starting with a. how many moles of SO2 can be formed? b. How many moles of CS2 will be used up? ANSWERS Practice A 1. The Reaction (row 1) and Change (row 3) rows must have the same ratios, because the coefficients determine the ratios in which the reacting particles are used up and formed. 2. WANT: all moles in mixture at end of reaction. Use a rice table to solve. Balanced equation: 2 Al + 3 Cl2 Reaction 2 AlCl3 2 Al Initial 3 Cl2 2 AlCl3 15.0 mol End ― 10.0 mol ― 15.0 mol + 10.0 mol 5.0 mol Change (use + and ―) 15.0 mol 0 mol 0 mol 10.0 mol The starting moles of reactants are equal, but with its higher coefficient, Cl2 is used up at a faster rate, so Cl2 is limiting. The End Cl2 moles must be zero, so the Cl2 Change must be ― 15.0 mol. In the Change row, the limiting Cl2 determines all of the other counts, based on the coefficients in the top row. The End row shows all counts at the end of the reaction. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 245 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 3. Balanced equation: 1 Mg + 2 HCl 1 MgCl2 + 1 H2 Reaction 1 Mg 2 HCl Initial 0.20 mol 0.10 mol ― 0.050 mol ― 0.10 mol Change End 0.15 mol 0 mol 1 MgCl2 1 H2 0 mol 0 mol + 0.050 mol + 0.050 mol + 0.050 mol + 0.050 mol One count in the End row must be zero and none may be negative. By trial and error, the HCl must be limiting. The HCl change must be ― 0.10 mol to get a zero in the End row. In the Change row, the limiting HCl moles determine all of the other moles. The ratios across the Change row must always match the ratios of the Reaction row. The End row shows all counts at the end of the reaction. Practice B 1 WANTED: moles of all components. To find the amounts in an end mixture, use a rice-moles table. To complete the Change row, either logic which is limiting by mental arithmetic or use a mole-to-mole conversion between the reactants with moles of either reactant as given. One mol-mol conversion that identifies the limiting reactant is 3 mol O2 ? mol O used up = 2.25 mol CH OH used up • 2 3 2 mol CH3OH = 3.38 mol O2 used up As all of the CH3OH reacts, 3.38 moles O2 is needed. In the initial mixture is 5.50 moles O2. The O2 is therefore in excess. Since one reactant must be limiting, it must be CH3OH. Use up the CH3OH. ***** 2 CH3OH Reaction 3 O2 2 CO2 4 H2O -- -- 2.25 mol 5.50 mol ― 2.25 mol ― 3.38 mol + 2.25 mol + 4.50 mol 0 mol 2.12 mol + 2.25 mol + 4.50 mol Initial Change (use +, ―) End The End row shows counts of all components present at the end of the reaction. Practice C 1. In Problem 3, O2 is in excess, so Mg must be limiting. In problems 2 and 4, you know the amounts of two reactants, so you need to find which is limiting. 2. WANTED: moles of all components. You are given grams and formulas for two reactants. From those data, you can find the moles for both. Knowing the moles of two reactants, to find the amounts in an end mixture, use a rice-moles table. The steps are: All units > all moles > rice-moles > WANTED units . © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 246 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Converting all supplied units to moles: ? mol NH3 = 1.70 g NH3 • 1 mol NH3 = 0.100 mol NH3 17.0 g NH3 ? mol O2 = 9.60 g O2 • 1 mol O2 = 0.300 mol O2 32.0 g O2 For row 1, balance the equation: 4 NH3 + 7 O2 4 NO2 + 6 H2O In the rice table, try using ratio arithmetic “in your head” first, but if unsure, use a mole-to-mole conversion. ***** O2 is used up about twice as fast according to the coefficients, but there are 3 times more initial moles of O2. O2 is therefore likely in excess and NH3 limiting. See if that works in the table. ***** Reaction 4 NH3 7 O2 Initial 0.100 mol 0.300 mol ― 0.100 mol Change End 6 H2O -- -- ― 0.175 mol + 0.100 mol + 0.150 mol 0.125 mol 0 mol 4 NO2 + 0.100 mol + 0.150 mol In the End row, make one reactant zero and the other reactants subtract to a positive value. The column with the zero contains the limiting reactant. Try to complete the Change row by mental arithmetic, but do the conversions if unsure. ***** ? mol O used up = 0.100 mol NH used up • 7 mol O2 = 0.175 mol O used up 2 3 2 4 mol NH3 ? mol H2O formed = 0.100 mol NH3 used up • 6 mol H2O = 0.150 mol H2O formed 4 mol NH3 The End row shows the moles of all components present at the end of the reaction. 3. WANTED: g MgO Since O2 is in excess, the limiting reactant must be Mg. If the limiting reactant is known and one other component is WANTED, the fastest way to solve is 7-step stoichiometry: WDBB, units given > moles given > moles WANTED > units WANTED . 2. DATA: 0.486 kg Mg (your single-unit given) 1 mol Mg = 24.3 g Mg 1 mol MgO = 40.3 g MgO 3. Balance: 2 Mg + 1 O2 4. Bridge: (the DATA prefix-grams Mg calls this g prompt) (the WANTED unit calls this g prompt) 2 MgO 2 mol Mg = 2 mol MgO 5-7. SOLVE. ? g MgO = 0.486 kg Mg • 103 g • 1 mol Mg • 2 mol MgO • 40.3 g MgO = 806 g MgO 1 kg 24.3 g Mg 2 mol Mg 1 mol MgO © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 247 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 4. WANTED: mol SO2 and mol CS2 Given grams and formulas for two reactants, you can find the moles for both. Knowing the moles of two reactants, you need to find which is limiting. To use a rice-moles table, the steps are: All units > all moles > rice-moles > WANTED units . For Row 1: 1 CS2 + 3 O2 1 CO2 + 2 SO2 Then convert all supplied units to moles. ? mol CS2 = 10.0 g CS2 • 1 mol CS2 = 0.131 mol CS2 76.2 g CS2 ? mol O2 = 10.0 g O2 • 1 mol O2 = 0.312 mol O2 32.0 g O2 Which is limiting? To use up 0.131 mol CS2 • 3 O2 / 1 CS2 = 0.393 mol O2 must be used up. Since that much O2 is not present, O2 is limiting. Use the O2 limiting moles to finish the Change row, either by inspection, quick arithmetic, or mole-to-mole conversions. ***** Reaction Initial Change End 1 CS2 3 O2 1 CO2 2 SO 2 0.131 mol 0.312 mol -- -- ―0.104 mol ―0.312 mol + 0.104 mol + 0.208 mol + 0.104 mol + 0.208 mol 0.027 mol 0 mol a. ? mol SO2 formed = double the 0.104 mol CS2 used up = 0.208 mol SO2 formed b. ? mol CS2 used up = 1/3 of 0.312 mol O2 limiting used up = 0.104 mol CS2 used up ***** © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 248 Module 10 – Stoichiometry Lesson 10I: Review Quiz For Modules 8-10 You may use a calculator and a periodic table. Work on your own paper. To answer multiple choice questions, it is suggested that you • Solve as if the question is not multiple choice, • Then circle your answer among the choices provided. Set a 30-minute limit. Answers are after the Summary that follows. ***** 1. (See Lessons 8B): The molar mass of Co(NO3)2 is a. 104.9 g/mol b. 134.9 g/mol c. 150.9 g/mol d. 182.9 g/mol e. 216.9 g/mol 2. (See Lessons 8D): 0.72 kg of water contain how many atoms? a. 2.4 x 1022 atoms d. 7.2 x 1022 atoms b. 2.4 x 1025 atoms c. 7.2 x 1025 atoms e. 2.4 x 1026 atoms 3. (Lesson 9C): If a substance is 25.1% hydrogen by mass and the rest is carbon, find the empirical formula. a. CH c. CH3 b. CH2 d. CH4 e. CH5 4. (Lesson 9D): What is the percent mass that is oxygen in carbon dioxide? a. 33.3 % b. 72.7 % c. 27.2 % Fe2O3 + 5. (Lesson 10E): For d. 66.7 % CO Fe + e. 32.1 % CO2 a. Balance the equation. b. If 33.5 g Fe is produced, how many moles of carbon monoxide are used up? a. 0.400 mol CO b. 0.601 mol CO c. 1.20 mol CO d. 1.81 mol CO e. 0.901 mol CO 6. (10G,H): If 40.2 g H2 gas is burned with 128 g O2 gas, how many moles of water form? a. 1.00 mol H2O b. 2.00 mol H2O c. 4.00 mol H2O d. 8.00 mol H2O e. 16.0 mol H2O ***** SUMMARY: Balanced Equations and Stoichiometry 1. In chemical equations, reactants on the left side are used up, and products on the right side form. 2. In chemical reactions, atoms and mass are neither created nor destroyed. 3. Balanced chemical equations have the same number and kind of atoms on both sides. The coefficients of a balanced equation show the exact ratios in which the particles react and form. 4. Coefficients can be read as molecules, particles, or any consistent multiple of molecules or particles. We most often read coefficients as exact moles. © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 249 Module 10 – Stoichiometry 5. Each term in a balanced equation is a coefficient followed by a substance formula. To count the number of each kind of atom represented by a term, multiply the coefficient by the subscript(s) for that atom. To count each type of atom on a side, add the atoms in each term on that side. 6. Only one set of ratios will balance a chemical equation. To balance equations, coefficients are added by trial and error. 7. Start balancing by putting a one in front of the most complex formula. If you need to eliminate fractions, multiply all coefficients by the denominator. 8. Prompts a. Grams Prompt: If you see g (or prefix-g) of a chemical formula, write in the DATA: (Molar Mass) # g formula = 1 mole formula b. Avogadro Prompt: If you see 10xx or any mix of units measuring visible and invisible particles, write 1 mole of anything = 6.02 x 1023 (molecules or particles) of anything. c. Stoichiometry Prompt: For reaction calculations, if WANTED substance ≠ given substance, a balanced equation and mole-to-mole bridge conversion will be needed. 9. The 7 Steps of Conversion Stoichiometry. If a reaction calculation WANTS a quantity of one substance, and a different substance is given, use these steps: 1. WANTED unit and substance 2. List the DATA. 3. Balance the equation. 4. Bridge: Write the mol WANTED to mol given equality, using coefficients. 5. Convert “? WANTED = given“ to moles given. 6. To moles WANTED. 7. To units WANTED. Summary: WDBB, then units > moles > moles > units 10. Limiting Reactants a. A reaction that goes to completion continues until one reactant is ~100% used up. (For now, assume reactions go to completion unless otherwise noted.) b. A reactant 100% used up is a limiting reactant. Reactants not limiting are in excess. The amount of limiting particles used up determines the amounts of other reactants used up and products formed. c. If a reaction goes to completion, one reactant must be limiting. If two reactants are limiting (both exactly used up), the two reactants are stoichiometrically equivalent. d. If the limiting reactant is known, the amount of any other reactant used up or product formed, can be calculated using 7-step conversion stoichiometry. e. If the limiting reactant is not known, either • Use 7-step stoichiometry in successive calculations to calculate the WANTED amount of one products. In each calculation, use as a given the known amounts for a different reactant. The calculation that forms the lowest amount of the WANTED substance has the limiting reactant as its given. OR, © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 250 Module 10 – Stoichiometry • Use a rice-moles table to calculate all of the moles used up, formed during the reaction, and present at the end of the reaction. 11. Rice-Moles Tables: Nearly all reaction calculations can be solved by a rice-moles table. a. The 4 table rows are labeled: Reaction, Initial, Change, End. b. All table numbers must have the same units. The units must count particles or be multiples of particle counts. c. In the Change row, reactants used up are assigned negative signs, and products formed are assigned positive signs. d. In the End row for reactions that go to completion, one number must be zero, more than one may be zero, but no numbers can be negative. e. To identify the limiting reactant, find the column that Ends in zero by ratio trial and error among the reactants. Use either quick arithmetic or mole-to-mole conversions. f. The Change in the limiting reactant, converted based on the coefficient ratios, determines all of the other counts in the Change row. g. If the DATA supplied is not in molecules or moles, use these rice table steps: All supplied units > all moles > rice-moles table > WANTED units 12. To Solve Reaction Amount Calculations, Use Which Method? If the reaction goes to completion and the given amount is clear, solve using conversion stoichiometry. In all other cases, or whenever you are not sure how to proceed, solve with a rice-moles table. ***** ANSWERS – Module 8-10 Review Quiz Some parts solutions are provided below 1. d. 182.9 g/mol 2. c. 7.2 x 1025 atoms (3 atoms per molecule.) 3. d. CH4 4. b. 72.7% O 5a. 1 Fe2O3 + 3 CO 6. d. 8.00 mol H2O (Two reactant amounts supplied? Find the limiting reactant first ). ( 25.1 g H, 74.9 g C, find lowest-whole-number mole ratios.) ( 32.0 g O / 44.0 g CO2 ) 2 Fe + 3 CO2 5b. e. 0.901 mol CO ##### © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 251 Module 10 – Stoichiometry NOTE on the Table of Atoms The atomic masses in the Table of Atoms in the following table use fewer significant figures than most similar tables in college textbooks. By “keeping the numbers simple,” it is hoped that you will use “mental arithmetic” to do easy numeric cancellations and simplifications before you use a calculator for arithmetic. Many of the calculations in these lessons have been set up so that you should not need a calculator at all to solve, if you look for easy cancellations first. The purpose is to give you practice at estimating answers. After any use of a calculator, it is important to estimate the answer using mental arithmetic and simple cancellations in order to catch errors in using the calculator. ##### © 2010 www.ChemReview.Net v. r6 Page 252 The ATOMS – The third column shows the atomic number: The protons in the nucleus of the atom. The fourth column is the molar mass, in grams/mole. For radioactive atoms, ( ) is the molar mass of most stable isotope. Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Boron Bromine Cadmium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Cesium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copper Curium Dysprosium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Ac Al Am Sb Ar As At Ba Bk Be Bi B Br Cd Ca Cf C Ce Cs Cl Cr Co Cu Cm Dy Er Eu Fm F Fr Gd Ga Ge Au Hf He Ho H In I Ir Fe Kr La Lr Pb Li Lu 89 13 95 51 18 33 84 56 97 4 83 5 35 48 20 98 6 58 55 17 24 27 29 96 66 68 63 100 9 87 64 31 32 79 72 2 67 1 49 53 77 26 36 57 103 82 3 71 (227) 27.0 (243) 121.8 40.0 74.9 (210) 137.3 (247) 9.01 209.0 10.8 79.9 112.4 40.1 (249) 12.0 140.1 132.9 35.5 52.0 58.9 63.5 (247) 162.5 167.3 152.0 (253) 19.0 (223) 157.3 69.7 72.6 197.0 178.5 4.00 164.9 1.008 114.8 126.9 192.2 55.8 83.8 138.9 (257) 207.2 6.94 175.0 Magnesium Manganese Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Rubidium Ruthenium Samarium Scandium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium Mg Mn Md Hg Mo Nd Ne Np Ni Nb N No Os O Pd P Pt Pu Po K Pr Pm Pa Ra Rn Re Rh Rb Ru Sm Sc Se Si Ag Na Sr S Ta Tc Te Tb Tl Th Tm Sn Ti W U V Xe Yb Y Zn Zr 12 25 101 80 42 60 10 93 28 41 7 102 76 8 46 15 78 94 84 19 59 61 91 88 86 75 45 37 44 62 21 34 14 47 11 38 16 73 43 52 65 81 90 69 50 22 74 92 23 54 70 39 30 40 24.3 54.9 (256) 200.6 95.9 144.2 20.2 (237) 58.7 92.9 14.0 (253) 190.2 16.0 106.4 31.0 195.1 (242) (209) 39.1 140.9 (145) (231) (226) (222) 186.2 102.9 85.5 101.1 150.4 45.0 79.0 28.1 107.9 23.0 87.6 32.1 180.9 (98) 127.6 158.9 204.4 232.0 168.9 118.7 47.9 183.8 238.0 50.9 131.3 173.0 88.9 65.4 91.2 ...
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