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Chem20Graphing - Module 20 Graphing Calculations in...

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Module 20 — Graphing ©2010 ChemReview.net v. 1m Page 417 Calculations in Chemistry Modules 19 and above have been re-numbered. Module 19 – Graphing is now Module 20. Module 20 – Spectra is now Module 21 If you are looking for Spectra topics, check Module 21 * * * * * Module 20 — Graphing Module 20 – Graphing .................................................................................................. 495 Lesson 20A: Graphing Fundamentals ................................................................................... 495 Lesson 20B: The Specific Equation for a Line ...................................................................... 504 Lesson 20C: Graphing Experimental Data ........................................................................... 514 Lesson 20D: Deriving Equations From Linear Data ........................................................... 521 Lesson 20E: Linear Equations Not Directly Proportional ................................................. 532 Lesson 20F: Graphing Inverse Proportions ......................................................................... 539
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Module 20 — Graphing ©2010 ChemReview.net v. 1m Page 495 Module 20 Graphing Timing : Begin this module when you are asked to make a line graph of data as part of a lab report or other assignment. Prerequisites : It will be helpful to do Lessons 17A, 18A and 18B prior to this module. Provisions : You will need a pencil, eraser, and about 5-10 sheets of graph paper (quarter- inch grid preferred), but you can begin the lessons without graph paper. Pretests: If you feel confident about your graphing ability, try the last graph in the problem set at the end of each lesson . If you can do the last graph easily, you should not need to do the others. If the last graph is difficult, complete the lesson. * * * * * Lesson 20A: Graphing Fundamentals Graphs A graph is a way to display numbers visually. There are many types of graphs, including bar graphs, pie charts, and histograms. In these lessons, our interest will be limited to line graphs: a type of graph often used to display experimental results. An example of a line graph is at the right. Computer software can also create graphs. However, in order to create a proper software graph, it is important to be able to do the basic graphing operations without a computer. Graphing Exercises In the following lessons you will “learn by doing” several types of line graphs. The exercises will proceed from relatively easy to difficult. The early examples can be solved in easier steps, but the steps we practice on simple cases will make more complex and computer graphs easier. Please try the rules suggested here. Tip #1: Graph In Pencil When making a graph by hand, use a pencil and eraser. Simple or rough graphs may be sketched in ink, but complex graphs may require draft numbers that are later erased. P vs. V for Trapped Air 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Volume (L) Pressure (atm)
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