When naming compounds

When naming compounds - When naming compounds remember the...

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Unformatted text preview: When naming compounds, remember the following rules: Binary Ionic Compounds (Type I) 1. The cation (positively charged ion; Na +, Al 3+ ) is always named first and the anion (negatively charged ion; Cl , O 2 ) second. 2. A monatomic (meaning one-atom) cation takes its name from the name of the element. For example, Na + is called sodium in the names of compounds containing this ion. 3. A monatomic anion is named by taking the root of the element name and adding -ide . Thus, the Cl ion is called chloride, the S 2 ion is called sulfide, and the O 2 ion is called oxide. 4. If the ion is named independent of the compound (in the free state), it is named element ion (Na + ; sodium ion or Cl ; chloride ion). Some common monatomic cations and anions are shown below Cation Name Cation Name Anion Name Anion Name H + Hydrogen Li + Lithium H Hydride F Fluoride Na + Sodium K + Potassium Cl Chloride Br Bromide Cs + Cesium Be 2+ Beryllium I Iodide O 2 Oxide Mg 2+ Magnesium Ca 2+ Calcium S 2 Sulfide Se 2 Selenide Ba 2+ Barium Al 3+ Aluminum N 3 Nitride P 3 Phosphide Zn 2+ Zinc Ag + Silver As 3 Arsenide C 4 Carbide Binary Ionic Compounds (Type II) 1. The cation of a transition metal is always named first (like any cation) and the anion second. 2. A monatomic (meaning one-atom) cation takes its name from the name of the element. For example, Cu + is called Copper(I) and Cu 2+ is called Copper(II) in the names of compounds containing these ions. The number in parentheses is the charge of the cation. 3. All transition metal cations, except Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Ag + (which always have the charges shown here), must show the oxidation number (charge) in parantheses following the English spelling of the element, such as Iron(III), Copper(I), or Vanadium(V), whenever a compound containing these ions, which have multiple charges, is named....
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course CHM 1025 taught by Professor J during the Summer '09 term at Santa Fe College.

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When naming compounds - When naming compounds remember the...

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