Workday_monolithic_whitepaper-ERPSystems

Workday_monolithic_whitepaper-ERPSystems - Moving beyond...

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What’s next for enterprise application architectures? Stan Swete Chief Technology Officer Moving beyond monolithic:
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2 Monolithic: Having a massive, unchanging structure that does not permit individual variation. Wiktionary The need to consolidate monolithic computing systems to smaller, more flexible solutions is driving a new model for enterprise application architecture. This trend is seen in hardware, databases, middleware, and— most pronouncedly—consumer Internet applications. IT professionals today understand the era of monolithic applications is in the past. And now they want to know what the future holds. This paper reviews the current state of enterprise application architecture and presents a prediction on what might come next. In addition, it outlines Workday’s vision for application architectures based on a core system of record.
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There are many theories on the evolution of computing. The following are two examples of the computing evolution: 1. Computing in Five Waves 2. Three Computing Eras In both views, it’s clear computing technology is moving away from monolithic architectures. This is true for all levels of the solution stack except for one: enterprise applications. 3 Enterprise Applications – A Brief History The evolution in hardware, operating systems, databases, and middleware over the last twenty-five years has been extraordinary. In each technology, less massive and more configurable solutions have emerged. As a result, IT professionals benefit from more choices and options for “individual variation,” which dramatically lowers the total cost of ownership for these solutions. The earliest enterprise applications involved automation of very specific business calculations—e.g., calculation of Payroll or Financial Account balances. By any measure, these applications were monolithic. There were constraints on the hardware level, the ability to make changes at the application level, and even the ability to access data. As technology continued to evolve, enterprise applications broadened their scope. Instead of focusing solely on automation of calculation, they broadened their scope to include business processes that involve multiple transaction steps—e.g., “order to cash” or “procure to pay.” While client-server applications (aided by relational databases) enabled more direct and flexible access to data, the drive to broader process automation resulted in these applications also becoming increasingly monolithic. The original vision of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) was to build an enterprise system to run the business. However, the reality at large companies was much different—multiple enterprise systems have been implemented to run the business. In an effort to be the “enterprise system,” ERP systems became more massive than previous architectures. Today, it’s apparent ERP overreached and failed to reach this goal, resulting in IT departments that needed to deal with multiple instances of
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course ITM 311 taught by Professor Harrisonmcknight during the Fall '10 term at Michigan State University.

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Workday_monolithic_whitepaper-ERPSystems - Moving beyond...

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