Darwin2 - Darwin's Precursors and Influences Heredity From...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Darwin's Precursors and Influences Heredity From the beginning, Darwin was concerned about the source of variation in a species on which selection could act, and in his notebooks sometimes played with a view of heredity not unlike modern population genetics 1 . However, he had a serious problem in the way in which he eventually developed his view. This is called the problem of blending inheritance. It was then widely accepted that use of a trait would strengthen its inheritance, while disuse would make it less strong in descendents. Sometimes Lamarck is credited (or blamed) for this opinion, but versions of it were common throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and possibly back as far as classical times and the Bible, up until the rediscovery of Mendelian genetics in 1900. Darwin accepted that use and disuse would affect heredity, and thus provide the source of variation for selection to act upon. Darwin thought that particles called "gemmules" would move from the extremities where an
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Darwin2 - Darwin's Precursors and Influences Heredity From...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online