Max Weber - people with common prestige level belonged to...

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Max Weber: Wealth, Prestiage and Power Weber agreed with Marx that economic factors are important in understanding individual and group behavior, but felt other factors are also important in defining a person's class location. (Max never wrote a theory of class, and died while starting a chapter on class.) Wealth-the value of all of a person's or family's economic assets, including income, personal property, and income-producing property. Weber divided the wage workers into two classes: the middle class (office workers, public officials, managers, and professionals) the working class (skilled, semiskilled, and unskilled) Prestige-respect or regard with which a person or status position is regarded by others. Weber believed that
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Unformatted text preview: people with common prestige level belonged to same class regardless of wealth. Occupation is a key source of prestige ranking. • Power-the ability to influence others, to influence decision making, to achieve goals despite opposition • What have the sources of power in the social history of humankind? How have the sources of power changed today? (Power with authority and power without authority) • Sociologists often use "socioeconomic status" to refer to a combined measure that attempts to classify individuals, families, or households in terms of factors such as income, occupation, and education to determine class location....
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Max Weber - people with common prestige level belonged to...

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