The ambiguity of makes

The ambiguity of makes - The ambiguity of makes Aristotles...

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The ambiguity of makes Aristotle’s point may be put this way: if we ask “what makes something so-and-so?” we can give four very different sorts of answer - each appropriate to a different sense of “makes.” Consider the following sentences: 1. The table is made of wood. 2. Having four legs and a flat top makes this (count as) a table. 3. A carpenter makes a table. 4. Having a surface suitable for eating or writing makes this (work as) a table. Aristotelian versions of (1) - (4): 1a. Wood is an aition of a table. 2a. Having four legs and a flat top is an aition of a table. 3a. A carpenter is an aition of a table. 4a. Having a surface suitable for eating or writing is an aition of a table. These sentences can be disambiguated by specifying the relevant sense of aition in each case: 1b. Wood is what the table is made out of . 2b. Having four legs and a flat top is what it is to be a table. 3b. A carpenter is what
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course PHI PHI2010 taught by Professor Jorgerigol during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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