The general structure of the argument

The general structure of the argument - The general...

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The general structure of the argument: a. There is knowledge. (implicit premise) b. Knowledge is of what is. (premise) c. Knowledge is infallible, belief is fallible. (premise) d. Therefore, what is known must be, what is believed may not be. e. That is, what is known is something that “purely and absolutely is,” what is believed is something that “partakes of both being and not-being.” f. Therefore, there are things that purely and absolutely are - things we call Forms (the F Itself, etc.). The participants in the Forms (the many F s, etc.) both are and are not. g. That is, Forms are the objects of knowledge; their participants are objects of belief. Interpreting the argument a. Plato’s three claims: (K) Knowledge is of what is . (477a1) (I) Ignorance is of what is not . (477a3) (B) Belief is of what is and is not . (477a-b) b. What is the sense of “is” (“be”) involved? o
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The general structure of the argument - The general...

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