But often they will follow from a conditional judgment that concerns only some of the relevant consi

But often they will follow from a conditional judgment that concerns only some of the relevant consi

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But often they will follow from a conditional judgment that concerns only some of the relevant considerations: Relative to considerations C* ( which fall short of the total set of considerations available to me), doing B is best An agent never acts against her unconditional, all-out judgments (since this is her intention). But she may well act against her conditional, all things considered judgments. This is what happens in cases of akrasia. In effect, the agent judges that, relative to all of the considerations available, doing A is best; but that relative to some subset of the considerations available, doing B is best. She then forms the unconditional all-out judgment that doing B is best on the basis of the second judgement, and acts on that. (She acts on the consideration of the delicious nature of the cake, and not on this consideration, together with the more significant consideration of the effect it will
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Unformatted text preview: have on her health.) This is to violate the principle of continence: act on the basis of all of the available considerations (compare the principle of total evidence for inductive reasoning: believe the hypothesis supported by all of the evidence). So the three principles are made consistent as follows: P1 If (S wants to do A more than to do B, and S believes that she can do either A or B, and S does either A or B intentionally), then S does A intentionally. P2 If S forms an unconditional, all-out judgement that doing A is better than doing B, then S wants to do A more than to do B P3 There are incontinent actions, i.e. agents sometimes act against their conditional, all things considered, judgements (or against the conditional judgements that they would have made if they had considered all of the evidence available to them). How satisfactory is this?...
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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