Self1 - Self-Determination Theory FUNDAMENTAL MOTIVATIONS...

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Self-Determination Theory FUNDAMENTAL MOTIVATIONS What are our fundamental motivations? There are the obvious physical ones: food, shelter, sex. But in addition there is a set of fundamental social motivations, fundamental in the sense that they are almost universal, and that we generally cannot flourish if we fail to achieve them.1 Although there is much debate over exactly how they should be classified, three command fairly widespread agreement.2 The first is a desire for social acceptance.3 The second is a desire for control: we become depressed and apathetic when we find that we cannot control our environment, either because it is uncontrollable, or because we lack the necessary competence.4 The third, which is the one of relevance for us, is a desire for self-determination. The idea of self-determination has been articulated and explored in the work of Edward Deci and Richard Ryan. They write: Some intentional behaviors, we suggest, are initiated and regulated through choice as an
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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