Whether such cases provide knowledge depends

Whether such cases provide knowledge depends - understood...

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Whether such cases provide knowledge depends (at least) on the reliability of the processes involved. It could be random; it could be not. The agent doesn’t know which. It is not picking; it is choosing. We merely pick when we know that we are using a random (or effectively random) process. Sometimes when we choose the process will be random, but very often it will not; and we don’t know which. Does this provide evidence that choice can precede judgment about what is best? Two worries: (1) Don’t these cases just show that agents can have prior unconscious beliefs about what is best? And so can’t we revert to the model in which choice is determined by belief. (2) Even if agents don’t have prior unconscious beliefs about what is best, shouldn’t these cases be
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Unformatted text preview: understood as showing that there are various ways that agents can generate such beliefs before choosing what to do? Answers in order: (1) There are cases and cases: (i) the agent does indeed have a prior unconscious belief that a certain option is best. (ii) the agent has a prior unconscious belief that there is something good about a certain option, but until they choose what to do, this belief is insufficiently integrated with their other beliefs to amount to a belief that this option is best. (iii) the agent has an unconscious disposition in favor of a certain option, but until they choose what to do, this disposition is insufficiently integrated with their other beliefs to amount to a belief at all....
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