WHAT DID THEY HAVE IN COMMON

WHAT DID THEY HAVE IN COMMON - WHAT DID THEY HAVE IN COMMON...

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WHAT DID THEY HAVE IN COMMON? The sweep of history which embraces the philosophers and schools we have just surveyed spans seven hundred years. We have looked at their differences and now we can briefly examine their similarities. The orgins of their philosophy lie, argues humanistic psychologist Mike Arons, "in an experience. ..of dissatisfaction, incompleteness, insufficiency" (1994, p. 17). This may be with the state of our knowledge about our world and the universe, or about how to live a satisfying life. From this beginning, the Greeks sought to fathom the nature of reality, they tried to fathom what it was to live life well, they formulated codes of ethics, and, argues Arons, they strove toward self-sufficiency (autarkeia), the same word Abraham Maslow used to describe the "self- actualizing" people he studied. Aristotle held that we aim toward a state of being in which "nothing lacks." While his approach of enumerating the things a person needed for such self- sufficiency differed from that of the Cynics and Stoics who emphasized letting go of attachments to things we can get along without, almost all aim at describing a path by which we can attain
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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WHAT DID THEY HAVE IN COMMON - WHAT DID THEY HAVE IN COMMON...

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