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Chpt16_pptteacher - RunningWater Chapter 16 Chapter 16...

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Running Water Chapter 16
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Chapter 16, Figure Opener
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Hydrologic cycle The hydrologic cycle is the circulation of Earth’s water supply Processes involved in the hydrologic cycle Precipitation Evaporation Infiltration Runoff Transpiration
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   The hydrologic cycle Figure 16.3
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  Sources of Earth’s water Figure 16.2
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   Running water Source of running water is rain water which lands on Earth surface and fed by groundwater. Drainage basin – land area that supplies water to a river system Drainage divides separate drainage basins Continental divide separates great drainage basins - Mississippi River system from those emptying into the Pacific
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Figure 16.4
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Figure 16.5
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River Systems Stream – term for any flowing body of water of any size, river, stream or creek River systems involve the entire network of streams within and including the drainage basin. It has three main interdependent parts: Zone of erosion Zone of sediment transport Zone of deposition The Earth’s river systems move surface materials, alter and shape landscapes
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Figure 16.6
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Zone of erosion Zone of erosion – aka zone of sediment production. Erosion dominates in upstream areas that have high topographic relief The upstream area where the stream begins is called the headwater of the stream. Most of the water and sediment is derived here from weathering of bedrock. As the stream moves downslope, masswasting and bank erosion brings in more sediment
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Zone of sediment transport Zone of sediment transport – trunk streams are the channels along which sediment is transported. When in balance the amount of sediment eroded equals the amount deposited elsewhere in the channel. Trunk streams are not a sediment source, they do not store or accumulate sediment
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Zone of deposition Zone of deposition – which can occur in all three zones. Here sediments usually enter a large body of water, an ocean where sediments are moved offshore by currents. Sediment can accumulate at the mouth of a stream and form a delta Sediment can be deposited into a variety of coastal features The sediment here is generally fine sediment, as the more coarse sediment would have been deposited upstream
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Running water Infiltration capacity is controlled by Intensity and duration of rainfall Amount of water already retained by the soil Soil texture and composition Slope of the land Nature of the vegetation that covers the area
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Runoff begins as sheetflow Sheetflow develops into tiny channels called rills which meet to form gullies, then a stream The term river refers to streams that carry a substantial amount of water.
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Streamflow Two types of flow determined primarily by velocity Laminar flow – water moves in a straight line path. Characteristic of slow moving streams
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course GEOL 1301 taught by Professor Gelbaum during the Fall '11 term at Georgia Perimeter.

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Chpt16_pptteacher - RunningWater Chapter 16 Chapter 16...

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