{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

time - CS6253:TimeandClocks Introduction Clocks,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CS6253: Time and Clocks Introduction Clocks, events and process states Synchronizing physical clocks Logical time and logical clocks Global States These slides are based on material provided by the authors of the textbook: Coulouris, Dollimore and Kindberg
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
10.1 Introduction   We need to measure time accurately: to know the time an event occurred at a computer to do this we need to synchronize its clock with an authoritative  external clock  Algorithms for clock synchronization useful for concurrency control based on timestamp ordering authenticity of requests e.g. in Kerberos There is no global clock in a distributed system this chapter discusses clock accuracy and synchronisation Logical time is an alternative It gives ordering of events - also useful for consistency of replicated  data
Background image of page 2
Computer clocks and timing events Each computer in a DS has its own internal clock  used by local processes to obtain the value of the current time processes on different computers can timestamp their events  but clocks on different computers may give different times computer clocks drift from perfect time and their drift rates differ from  one another.  clock drift rate : the relative amount that a computer clock differs  from a perfect clock Even if clocks on all computers in a DS are set to the same  time, their clocks will eventually vary quite significantly unless  corrections are applied
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Clocks, events and process states A distributed system is defined as a collection  P  of  N  processes   p i , i =  1,2,… N Each process  p has a state  s consisting of its variables (which it  transforms as it executes) Processes communicate only by messages (via a  network) Actions of processes : Send, Receive,  change own state Event:  the occurrence of a single action that a process carries out as it  executes e.g.  Send, Receive,  change state Events at a single process p i , can be placed in a total ordering denoted  by the relation  i  between the events. i.e. e   i   e ’ if and only if  e  occurs before  e ’ at  p i A history of process p i:  is a series of events ordered by  i history (p i )= h =   <e i 0 e i 1 e i 2 , …>
Background image of page 4
Clocks We have seen how to order events (happened before) To timestamp events, use the computer’s clock At real time,  t , the OS reads the time on the computer’s  hardware clock  H i ( t ) It calculates the time on its software clock   C i ( t )=  α H i ( t ) +  β e.g. a 64 bit number giving nanoseconds since some base  time
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}