Shakespeare - Jill Doverspike English 444 Same Shrew Different Day For many years directors and producers have taken great pieces of literature and

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Jill Doverspike English 444 11/3/2011 Same Shrew, Different Day For many years directors and producers have taken great pieces of literature and molded them into wonderful motion pictures. In doing so, they have provided a way to educate people who might not be book readers, and further extend the knowledge and understanding of people who are. In 1999 Gil Junger, along with an all-star cast, did just that: he took Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew and adapted it into a hilarious comedy entitled 10 Things I Hate About You , (“10 Things…”). This modernization of the classic play is not only wonderfully entertaining, but also educational to anyone looking to further understand Shakespeare’s play. Straying from typical adaptations, Junger does not quote Shakespeare directly throughout the entirety of his work, but instead spins a new story based on the old classic. Aside from having very similar titles, one can see the mirror images in the two works. Though there are definite differences, through keeping the plot and characters similar, one can easily compare the two. To start a comparison of the two plays and see how the original work influenced the adaptation and its effect on the audience, one must look at the plots. Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew is a very well known play, and therefore may not need much summarization. In this play we are introduced to the beautiful and gentle Bianca. Bianca has no shortage of admirers, but her father insists that she may not marry until her shrewish sister, Katherine, is betrothed. Bianca's suitors, of which there are three, Lucentio, Gremio and Hortensio, persuade a character named Petruchio to court her. The suitors pay for any costs involved and there is also the goal of Katharina's dowry. Though at first it seems that Katherine will never be “tamed” as she clearly despises Petruchio, eventually the goal of her wooing is met. Petruchio marries Katherine and he
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carries her off to his country house with his servant Grumio. Petruchio intends to browbeat Katherine into submission and he denies her food, sleep and new clothes, whilst continuously singing her praises. Eventually Katherine is in fact tamed. They return to Padua where Lucentio has won Bianca. At a banquet they wager on who has the most obedient wife. Each wife is issued with commands but only Katherine obeys and promptly lectures everyone on the importance of wifely submission(“No Fear…”). The plot of 10 Things I Hate About You is clearly focused toward a 21 st century audience. In the begging of the film we meet Cameron, played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, a new student at Padua Stadium High School . Cameron notices the beautiful and popular Bianca Stratford, portrayed by Larisa Oleynik, and is immediately smitten with her. Cameron is warned that that Bianca is shallow and conceited, and that her father does not allow her to date. Following the
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course ENG 444 taught by Professor Knoppers during the Fall '11 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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Shakespeare - Jill Doverspike English 444 Same Shrew Different Day For many years directors and producers have taken great pieces of literature and

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