002_RFW6e_The_Writing_Process_(pages_2-57)

002_RFW6e_The_Writing_Process_(pages_2-57) -...

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The Writing Process 1. Generating ideas and planning 2 2. Drafting 20 3. Making global revisions; revising sentences 27 4. Writing paragraphs 40
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Writing is not a matter of recording already developed thoughts but a process of Fguring out what you think. Since it’s not pos- sible to think about everything all at once, most experienced writers handle a piece of writing in stages. You will generally move from planning to drafting to revising, but be prepared to return to earlier stages as your ideas develop. 1 Generate ideas and sketch a plan. Before attempting a Frst draft, spend some time generating ideas. Mull over your subject while listening to music or driving to work, jot down inspirations, and explore your insights with anyone willing to listen. Ask yourself questions: What do you Fnd puzzling, striking, or interesting about your subject? What would you like to know more about? At this stage, you should be collecting information and experimenting with ways of fo- cusing and organizing it to reach your readers. 1a Assess the writing situation. Begin by taking a look at the writing situation in which you Fnd yourself. The key elements of the writing situation include your subject, the sources of information available to you, your pur- pose, your audience, and constraints such as length, document design, review sessions, and deadlines. It is likely that you will make Fnal decisions about all of these matters later in the writing process—after a Frst draft, for example. Nevertheless, you can save yourself time by thinking about as many of them as possible in advance. ±or a quick checklist, see the chart on page 3. 2 The Writing Process plan 1 ACADEMIC ENGLISH What counts as good writing varies from culture to culture and even among groups within cultures. In some situations, you will need to become familiar with the writing styles — such as direct or indirect, personal or imper- sonal, plain or embellished—that are valued by the culture or discourse community for which you are writing.
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Planning 3 plan 1a Checklist for assessing the writing situation Subject Has the subject (or a range of possible subjects) been given to you, or are you free to choose your own? What interests you about your subject? What questions would you like to explore? Why is your subject worth writing about? How might readers ben- eFt from reading about it? How broadly can you cover the subject? Do you need to narrow it to a more speciFc topic (because of length restrictions, for instance)? Sources of information Where will your information come from: Reading? Personal expe- rience? Observation? Interviews? Questionnaires? What sort of documentation is required? Purpose and audience Why are you writing: To inform readers? To persuade them? To en- tertain them? To call them to action? Some combination of these?
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002_RFW6e_The_Writing_Process_(pages_2-57) -...

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