012_RFW6e_Answers_to_Tutorials_and_Lettered_Exercises_(pages_578-591)

012_RFW6e_Answers_to_Tutorials_and_Lettered_Exercises_(pages_578-591)

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Unformatted text preview: TUTORIAL 1, page xix 1. A verb has to agree with its subject. (21) 2. Each pronoun should agree with its antecedent. (22) 3. Avoid sentence fragments. (19) 4. Its important to use apostrophes correctly. (36) 5. Check for - ed verb endings that have been dropped. (27d) 6. Discriminate carefully between adjectives and adverbs. (26) 7. If your sentence begins with a long introductory word group, use a comma to separate the word group from the rest of the sentence. (32b) 8. Dont write a run-on sentence; you must connect independent clauses with a comma and a coordinating conjunction or with a semicolon. (20) 9. A writer must be careful not to shift his or her [ not their] point of view. Or Writers must be careful not to shift their point of view. (13a) 10. Watch out for dangling modifiers. (12e) TUTORIAL 2, page xix 1. The index entry each mentions that the word is singular, so you might not need to look further to realize that the verb should be has , not have . The first page reference takes you to section 21, which explains in more detail why has is correct. The index entry has vs. have also leads you to section 21. 2. The index entry lying vs. laying takes you to section 27b, where you will learn that lying (meaning reclining or resting on a surface) is correct. 3. Look up only and you will be directed to section 12a, which explains that limiting modifiers such as only should be placed before the words they modify. The sentence should read We looked at only two houses before buy- ing the house of our dreams . 4. Looking up you , inappropriate use of leads you to section 23d and the Glossary of Usage, which explain that you should not be used to mean any- one in general. You can revise the sentence by using a person or one in- stead of you , or you can restructure the sentence completely: In Saudi Ara- bia, accepting a gift is considered ill mannered . 5. The index entries I vs. me and me vs. I take you to section 24, which ex- plains why her sister and me is correct. TUTORIAL 3, page xx 1. Section 32c states that, although usage varies, most experts advise using a comma between all items in a seriesto prevent possible misreadings or ambiguities. To find this section, Ray Farley would probably use the menu system. 2. Maria Sanchez and Mike Lee would consult section 29, on articles. This sec- tion is easy to locate in the menu system. 3. Section 24 explains why Jane and me is correct. To find section 24, John Pell could use the menu system if he knew to look under Problems with pro- nouns. Otherwise, he could look up I vs. me in the index. Pell could also 578 Answers to Tutorials and Lettered Exercises look up myself in the index or he could consult the Glossary of Usage, where a cross-reference would direct him to section 24....
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012_RFW6e_Answers_to_Tutorials_and_Lettered_Exercises_(pages_578-591)

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