RFW6e_Research_(pages_382-475)

RFW6e_Research_(pages_382-475) - 381-410_63657_Part...

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Research 49. Conducting research 383 50. Evaluating sources 397 51. Managing information; avoiding plagiarism 405 Writing MLA Papers 52. Supporting a thesis 411 53. Citing sources; avoiding plagiarism 415 54. Integrating sources 418 55. Documenting sources 426 56. MLA manuscript format; sample paper 463 Writing APA Papers 57. Supporting a thesis 476 58. Citing sources; avoiding plagiarism 479 59. Integrating sources 483 60. Documenting sources 489 61. APA manuscript format; sample paper 511
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College research assignments ask you to pose a question worth exploring, to read widely in search of possible answers, to inter- pret what you read, to draw reasoned conclusions, and to support those conclusions with valid and well-documented evidence. The process takes time: time for researching and time for drafting, revising, and documenting the paper in the appropriate style (see 55 and 60). Before beginning a research project, set a realistic schedule of deadlines. One student created a calendar to map out her tasks for a research paper assigned on October 3 and due October 31. 382 Research res 49 2 3 Receive assign- ment. 4 Pose questions worth exploring. 5 Talk with a librarian; plan a search strategy. 6 7 Settle on a topic. Loca 8 9 10 11 12 13 Draft a tentaive thesis and an outline. 14 15 16 17 18 19 Visit the writing center to get help with ideas for revision. 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Prepare a list of works cited. 29 30 Proofread the Fnal draft. 31 Final draft due. Read and take notes. Draft the paper. Draft the paper. Revise the paper. Do further research if necessary. te sources. SAMPLE CALENDAR FOR A RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT
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49 Conducting research Throughout this section, you will encounter examples related to three sample research papers: • A paper on the dangers of Internet surveillance in the work- place, written by a student in an English composition class (see pp. 467–75). The student, Anna Orlov, uses the MLA (Modern Language Association) style of documentation. • A paper on the limitations of medications to treat childhood obesity, written by a student in a psychology class (see pp. 515–28). The student, Luisa Mirano, uses the APA (Amer- ican Psychological Association) style of documentation. • A paper on the extent to which Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest can be held responsible for the Fort Pillow massacre, written by a student in a history class. The stu- dent, Ned Bishop, uses the Chicago Manual of Style docu- mentation system. Bishop’s paper and guidelines for Chicago -style documentation appear on the Rules for Writ- ers Web site <dianahacker.com/rules>. 49a Pose possible questions worth exploring. Working within the guidelines of your assignment, pose a few questions that seem worth researching. Here, for example, are some preliminary questions jotted down by students enrolled in a variety of classes in different disciplines.
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course LEGAL PA101 taught by Professor Pamelabasmajian during the Winter '11 term at Kaplan University.

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RFW6e_Research_(pages_382-475) - 381-410_63657_Part...

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