Chicago - Chicago AC337 American Blues Music Im Goin To...

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Chicago AC337 American Blues Music
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“I’m Goin’ To Chicago, Baby Don’t You Want to Go.” The Great Migration north began in 1916. Between 1916 and 1970 7 million African Americans left the South. Chicago attracted more than 500,000 of these migrants, and before the migration, African Americans constituted 2 percent of Chicago's population; by 1970, they were 33 percent.   At first - in the late 1930s and early 40s - much like in the South, musicians played on the streets, house parties, and a very few clubs.
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Maxwell Street One of the main places to play was Maxwell Street Beginning in the 1880s Maxwell Street was home to mostly Russian Jews, and they quickly established not only many shops on Maxwell Street, but opened the street up to a kind of “old world” street market. By the 1920s African Americans had become the primary occupants of Maxwell Street, but the area was still known as “Jew Town” since so many of the businesses were still owned by the original Jewish families.
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Enter Lester Melrose Lester Melrose was born in 1891 in Illinois and in 1918 he formed the Melrose Brothers Music Company and hired Jelly Roll Morton to be the company’s arranger and composer. In 1925 he became an independent A&R man and had his first hit when he produced “It’s Tight Like That” by Georgia Tom Dorsey and Tampa Red in 1925 Melrose “invented” the “studio session” system, in which he has a stable of musicians who made records together. The record would be released under the name of whomever was the featured singer, but the musicians were all the same. Among the musicians he had as part of this system were: Big Bill Broonzy (gtr, vcl),
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course AMCULT 337 taught by Professor Bruceconforth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Chicago - Chicago AC337 American Blues Music Im Goin To...

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