The Blues Revival Pt2 Electric

The Blues Revival Pt2 Electric - The Blues Revival Pt. 2 -...

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The Blues Revival Pt. 2 - Electric AC337 American Blues Music
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Where’s It From? We’ve seen a few factors that contributed to this revival: 1) The folk music boom 2) R&B programming on radio stations 3) A political product of the 60s: an identification with the expression of an oppressed and alienated Black subculture by an also alienated white youth counterculture. As part of the “folk boom” the original focus was on music that was acoustic and traditional. This was the “cult of authenticity.”
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Electric bands were scorned and the early folk festivals would not allow artists like Muddy Waters’ band to perform. A good example of how artists at the time tried to get around this academic fixation is in John Lee Hooker’s early 1960s career: He played acoustic at folk festivals He played electric at the local blues bars in Detroit He went either way at college gigs Muddy had to play at the Newport Jazz Festival because he was denied the ability to play at the Newport Folk Festival. It would take young white musicians to “legitimize” electric blues to a new audience.
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Paul Butterfield was born in Chicago in 1942. He was the son of a lawyer and grew up in the Hyde Park section (which is on the south side, location of the University of Chicago and most of the then extant blues clubs). In 1963 they formed a band with Sam Lay (drums) and Jerome Arnold (bass), both from Howlin’ Wolf’s band Paul Butterfield In late 1962 he met University of Chicago student, and guitarist, Elvin Bishop, and together they started hanging out at the clubs, eventually sitting in with people like Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, and Junior Wells.
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In early 1963 they got a job as the house band at the club called Big John’s where they met fellow blues aficionado and guitarist Mike Bloomfield who soon joined the group. They became Chicago’s first truly
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course AMCULT 337 taught by Professor Bruceconforth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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The Blues Revival Pt2 Electric - The Blues Revival Pt. 2 -...

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