Thousands and Kings - AC337 American Blues Music Jimmy...

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AC337 American Blues Music
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Jimmy Rogers We’ve already met Rogers but haven’t discussed his solo career. He left Muddy in 1954 to form his own band. Rogers had a series of hits starting with “That’s All Right” still very much in the Delta mode, but his subsequent recordings left Muddy’s style behind and pushed the sound of the blues into the modern era. “Act Like You Love Me” is a good example of his more modern approach.
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Junior Wells Junior Wells was born in Memphis, Tennessee in 1932 and moved to Chicago in 1948. He immediately started playing at house parties with other musicians. He made his first recordings at 18 (1950) when he briefly replaced Little Walter (one of his idols, only 2 years older, with Muddy’s band. In 1953 he started his own band and was recording for States Records. He used Muddy’s band for his first big record “Hoodoo Man” and had one of his biggest hits with “Messin’ With The Kid” Although one of the great harp players in later years he played less and focused on his singing. He died in 1998.
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Jimmy Reed Jimmy Reed was born in Dunleith, Mississippi in 1925. He spent several years playing on the streest and moved to Chicago in 1943 when he was drafted into the Navy. After the war he tried unsuccessfully to get a contract with Chess Records but signed with Vee-Jay (the same label that put out the first Beatles album in America) largely because of the influence of the drummer he was playing with, Albert King.
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He had a string of hits that became classics: “Big Boss Man,” “Bright Lights Big City,” “I Ain’t Got You” and many others. Reed played harp in a holder while he played guitar and was a very accomplished harp player for that style. He had a highly stylistic voice that made him immediately identifiable. He suffered from epilepsy which was misdiagnosed as delirium tremens (alcohol-related) and had trouble remembering his lyrics so his wife would accompany him to jobs and recording sessions to help prompt him He died in 1976.
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His parents split up when he was 4 and he went to live with his maternal grandmother. She was very religious and took the young Riley to the Holiness Church in Kilmichael, Mississippi where he was influenced by the preacher - Archie Fair - who taught Riley how to play a simple E progression on the guitar. His grandmother died in 1940 when he was 15 and although he tried to farm her land by himself for a year he eventually moved in with his father. Riley B. King was born in this shack near Itta Bena, Mississippi on September 16, 1925. His parents were sharecroppers. By the age of 9 he had started a gospel signing group and was attending school regularly. Riley B. King
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He lived with his father for 2 years but got homesick for the Kilmichael area and moved back to resume his education at the Elkhorn School and to get his singing group back together. Although things were going good in
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course AMCULT 337 taught by Professor Bruceconforth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Thousands and Kings - AC337 American Blues Music Jimmy...

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