PUBPOL481_6JAN2011b1 - PUBPOL-481/PHYSICS-481: WINTER TERM...

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PUBPOL-481/PHYSICS-481: WINTER TERM 2011 NATIONAL SCIENCE POLICY IN THE 21ST CENTURY Professor Homer A. Neal and Professor James J. Duderstadt 8:30 – 10:00 am Tuesday/ Thursday 1120 Weil Hall
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Topics for Today Define science policy Introduce instructors Discuss textbook Review Syllabus Review examples of impact of science policy on society Note clouds on the horizon
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Scope of Course: Questions Addressed What is science policy? Why is it important to society? Who makes science policy? Who are the players in conducting R/D What is the state of science education? What are our science/engineerin g workforce needs? How is U.S. R/D affected by globalization?
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Drill-down to another Level: Examples of Topics to be Covered Organization of Governmental Entities supporting scientific research How National Science Policy is Made Funding Trends The Role of Universities, Big Science The Science and Engineering Workforce and Science Education in the US Ethics and Integrity in Science
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What is “National Science Policy?” “National science policy” refers to the set of federal rules, regulations, methods, practices, and guidelines under which scientific research is conducted. It also refers to the dynamic, complex, and interactive processes and procedures— both inside and outside government—that influence and affect how these rules, regulations, methods, practices, and guidelines are devised and implemented . “National Science Policy: Beyond Sputnik”, Neal, Smith, McCormick, University of Michigan Press
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Some Examples of National Science Policies that had a Major Impact
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Examples of National Science Policies “Put a Man on the Moon” “Launch the Human Genome Project” “Build the Superconducting Supercollider” “Let universities keep intellectual property developed with federal grants” “Ban cloning of humans” “Limit embryonic stem cell research” “Regulate the use of humans subjects in experimentation”
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LIKELY STUDENT OPERATIONAL QUESTIONS How much reading will I have to do? How many papers will I have to write? How many exams will I have to take? What will be the grading weights? Will there be study sessions available? Will I get to interact with science policy leaders? Suppose I do not intend to go into a science policy job? What examples exist of jobs where science policy is important?
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Grading Weights Science Editorial – 10% Policy Memo – 15% Semester Report 20% Exam #1 – 25% Exam #2 – 30%
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Science Editorial Science Editorial On occasion there are instances in which perspectives on a particular
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PUBPOL481_6JAN2011b1 - PUBPOL-481/PHYSICS-481: WINTER TERM...

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