2011 02 24 Big Science

2011 02 24 Big Science - Big Science and U.S. National...

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Unformatted text preview: Big Science and U.S. National Science Policy PUBPOL/PHYSICS 481 H. A. Neal February 24, 2011 Questions To Be Addressed n What Do We Mean By Big Science And What Distinguishes It From Normal Science? n Why Do We Need Big Science? n What Are The Downsides To Big Science? n What Are Some Examples Of Past Big Science Projects? n What Are The Risks And Benefits Of International Cooperation in Big Science Projects? n What Are The Political Risks Of Big Science Projects? n Why Do Big Science Projects Affect Universities In Special Ways? n What Are Some Of The Current Big Science Frontiers? n What Does The Future Hold? What Distinguishes Big Science Projects from Regular Science Projects? n Their costs n The number of scientists involved n How they are conceived and proposed n How they are funded n How their ongoing funding is assured or not n How they impact other ongoing programs n How they influence public expectation of immediate outcomes n How contributions of individuals are recognized n Their requirements for regional, national or international cooperation n The attention they attract from politicians Aerial view of CERN in Geneva A Contrast: Experimenters in the ATLAS Project at CERN Fermilab --Chicago ITER Project ITER and the setting of Project Priorities Scanning of Bubble Chamber Photograph BIG SCIENCE IN ITS DAY A Tribute to Human Innovativeness: The Evolution of Accelerator Technology Spinoffs in Medicine and Electric Power Fields Why do we care about quarks? Evolution of the Universe The Major Challenges Today n What is the origin of mass? n Is there evidence for Supersymmetry? n Is there evidence for structure in quarks? n Is there evidence for extra dimensions? n . n Is there evidence for spin effects at multi- TeV energies? The Higgs Boson n hypothetical particle that would address question of particle mass n last particle predicted by Standard Model n without the Higgs nothing would exist as matter (Kane) n confirmation should be in reach of LHC experiments BEBC at CERN Microcosm (UM REU Students: 2003) UM CERN REU ..the long road toward finding the fundamental structure of matter ... A Matter of Scale n We must describe physical entities spanning distances of a million billion billion meters all the way down to a millionth of a billionth of a meter n We must describe physical processes spanning times from a millionth of a second following the Big Bang all the way to times of billions of years. From the atom to the quark .the quark ....
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course PUBPOL 481 taught by Professor Duderstadt during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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2011 02 24 Big Science - Big Science and U.S. National...

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