Lect+03-12610_class - Overview of Lecture 3 (1-26-10) z...

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Unformatted text preview: Overview of Lecture 3 (1-26-10) z Concepts and Characteristics of habituation and sensitization z The Dual- Process Theory of Habituation and Sensitization • Applications of the Dual- Process Theory • Implications of the Dual- Process Theory z Extensions to Emotions and Motivated Behavior • Emotional Reactions and Their Aftereffects • The Opponent Process Theory of Motivation z Concluding Comments z Ch 3. Classical Conditioning: Foundations Announcments z Textbook z How to prepare for class Repeated Stimulation Sensitization effect Increased response with repeated stimulation. Habituation effect Decreased response with repeated stimulation. Trials Response Habituation effect Sensitization effect Trials Response Function Habituation effects – allow individual to direct limited attentional resources elsewhere. Sensitization effects – attract individuals attention to potentially biologically important stimuli. Habituation vs. sensory adaptation and response fatigue z Sensory adaptation • A temporary reduction in the sensitivity of sense organs caused by repeated or excessive stimulation. z Fatigue • A temporary decrease in behavior caused by repeated or excessive use of the muscles involved in the behavior. Separating Habituation From Sensory Adaptation or Motor Fatigue z Habituation is a learned decrease in responding to repeated stimulation. z Not a decrease in sensory sensitivity: adaptation . z Not a decrease in motor responsivity: fatigue . z Recovery after rest does not prove that response decrement was learned. Recovery Without Rest z Dishabituation : Add new, neutral stimulus along with habituated stimulus. z Generalization of habituation : Change habituated stimulus. z Context change : Change context from training to testing. z Recovery in above cases is not due to sensory adaptation or motor fatigue. Dishabituation effect Trials Response tone tone tone tone tone tone Dishabituation Stimulus B: Flash of light Dishabituation effect Dishabituation effect Trials Response Effects of a strong extraneous stimulus. Responses to Stimulus Repeated Trials Response to stimulus A (tone) Response to stimulus A (tone) Present Stimulus B (light) Present Stimulus B (light) Response to stimulus A (tone) Response to stimulus A (tone) Dishabituation: Dishabituation: The recovery of a habituated response as a result of a strong extraneous stimulus. Recovery Without Rest z Dishabituation : Add new, neutral stimulus along with habituated stimulus. z Generalization of habituation : Change habituated stimulus. z Context change : Change context from training to testing. z Recovery in above cases is not due to sensory adaptation or motor fatigue. Change habituated stimulus Recovery Without Rest z Dishabituation : Add new, neutral stimulus along with habituated stimulus....
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 830:311 taught by Professor Rovee-collier during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

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Lect+03-12610_class - Overview of Lecture 3 (1-26-10) z...

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