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Lect 17 April 8_ch9_ - Chapter 9 Extinction of Conditioned Behavior Chapter 10 Aversive Control Avoidance and Punishment April 8 Extinction and

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 9: Extinction of Conditioned Behavior Chapter 10: Aversive Control: Avoidance and Punishment April 8 Extinction and Original Learning Spontaneous Recovery Renewal of Original Excitatory Conditioning Reinstatement of Conditioned Excitation Retention of Knowledge of the Reinforcer Retention of Knowledge of the Reinforcer Review of : Reinstatement refers to the recovery of conditioned behavior produced by exposures to the unconditioned stimulus. context conditioning is: important, the role of context is to disambiguate the significance of a stimulus that has a mixed history of conditioning and extinction. Context has relatively little effect on stimuli that do not have a history of extinction. Retention of Knowledge of the Reinforcer Rats were trained in an experimental chamber that had two response levers. Pressing one of the levers produced a pellet of food Pressing the other lever produced a few drops of a sugar solution. During the next session, extinction was in effect for both responses for 15 minutes. Responding on both levers declined rapidly during this extinction phase. One of the reinforcers ( either a food pellet or sugar water) was then presented once and responding was monitored for the next three minutes. Reinstatement of Conditioned Excitation Reinstatement of Conditioned Excitation For subjects that were conditioned with the weak shock and did not receive extinction ( left ), it did not make any difference whether the reinstatement shocks occurred in the test context ( shock same) or elsewhere ( shock different). This outcome shows that contextual conditioning did not summate with the suppression elicited by the target CS. Weak shock; no extinction Reinstatement of Conditioned Excitation Subjects that received extinction ( right side), reinstatement shocks given in the same context as testing produced significantly more response suppression than shocks given in a different context. This outcome shows that context conditioning facilitates the reinstatement effect. Weak shock; extinction Retention of Knowledge of the Reinforcer Rats were trained in an experimental chamber that had two response levers. Pressing one of the levers produced a pellet of food Pressing the other lever produced a few drops of a sugar solution. During the next session, extinction was in effect for both responses for 15 minutes. Responding on both levers declined rapidly during this extinction phase. One of the reinforcers ( either a food pellet or sugar water) was then presented once and responding was monitored for the next three minutes. Retention of Knowledge of the Reinforcer Presentation of a reinforcer after extinction produced a selective recovery of lever pressing....
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 830:311 taught by Professor Rovee-collier during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

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Lect 17 April 8_ch9_ - Chapter 9 Extinction of Conditioned Behavior Chapter 10 Aversive Control Avoidance and Punishment April 8 Extinction and

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