Ch13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance(NMR Spectroscopy NMR is...

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Unformatted text preview: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy NMR is the most powerful analytical tool currently available to an organic chemist. NMR allows characterization of a very small amount of sample (10mg), and does not destroy the sample (non-destructive technique). NMR spectra can provide vast information about a molecule's structure and can very often be the only way to prove what the compound really is. Typically though, NMR is used in conjunction with other types of spectroscopy and chemical analysis to fully confirm a complicated molecule's structure. NMR Theory Any nucleus that has either an odd atomic number or an odd mass number has a nuclear spin that can be observed by an NMR spectrometer. The proton is the simplest odd numbered atomic nucleus (and also the most useful for organic characterization). NMR theory is reasonably complicated, involving the magnetic alignment of spins of different nuclei. More important is the use of NMR to elucidate structures....
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Ch13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance(NMR Spectroscopy NMR is...

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