6-3 - because the same relationship exists in both the...

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Understanding Proportions Understanding Proportions Lesson 6-3
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Vocabulary Vocabulary A proportion is an equation stating that two ratios are equal. To prove that two ratios form a proportion, you must prove that they are equivalent. To do this, you must demonstrate that the relationship between numerators is the same as the relationship between denominators.
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Examples: Do the ratios form Examples: Do the ratios form a proportion? a proportion? 7 10 , 21 30 x 3 x 3 Yes, these two ratios DO form a proportion,
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Unformatted text preview: because the same relationship exists in both the numerators and denominators. 8 9 , 2 3 4 3 No, these ratios do NOT form a proportion, because the ratios are not equal. Completing a Proportion Completing a Proportion Determine the relationship between two numerators or two denominators (depending on what you have). Execute that same operation to find the part you are missing. Example Example 35 40 = 7 5 5 8 Homework Time Homework Time...
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6-3 - because the same relationship exists in both the...

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