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Memory+Tips+from+Dominic+O - Memory Tips from Dominic...

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Memory Tips from Dominic O'Brien Courtesy of Dominic O'Brien By Liz Neporent Quick, read this list: Butter, telephone, bed sheet, aspirin, staples, goat, pencil, seltzer, basket, photograph. Now close your eyes and count to ten. Turn away and recall as many of the items on the list as you can without checking back. No peeking, please. How did you do? If you’re good, you recalled perhaps three items, a perfect demonstration of the limits of the average person’s short term memory. It’s this limitation you have to thank for the lack of ability to remember the name of the person you just met and why you can never, ever seem to find your keys, cell phone or birth certificate. Now imagine memorizing the order of 54 decks of inter-shuffled cards with only a single glance at each. It seems impossible, yet that’s what World Memory Champ Dominic O’Brien was able to do. On May 1st, 2002, the Englishman committed a random sequence of 2808 playing cards (54 packs) to memory after looking at each card only once. He was able to correctly recite their order, making only eight errors, four of which he immediately corrected when told he was wrong. It’s a Guinness Book of World Records feat that still stands today. In fact, O’Brien now makes his living traveling the world, remembering things. He gives lectures, speaks at corporate events and through his company, Peak Performance Training , he instructs mere mortals like you and me on how to improve our powers of recall for facts, figures, names dates and faces. He’s also written 10 best selling memory improvement books. We
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