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class+10+lecture_posted - Sensation and Perception Class X:...

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Sensation and Perception Class X: Space Perception (cont.)
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Space Perception and Binocular Vision 6
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Introduction Positivism : The belief that the only authentic knowledge is that which can be directly perceived by the senses, thus rejecting metaphysics. Father of positivism: Auguste Comte : Founder of sociology, early philosopher of science, looked at how the methods of physical sciences could be applied to the study of people and societies.
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Introduction If we only perceive the world through our senses, is the world we perceive real? Famous recent positivist: author Philip K. Dick Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner) A Scanner Darkly Total Recall Minority Report Jean Baudrillard’s “Simulacra and Simulation” Analogy of the map of the empire Heavily influenced “The Matrix”
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Introduction Euclidian geometry : Parallel lines remain parallel as they are extended in space Objects maintain the same size and shape as they move around in space Internal angles of a triangle always add to 180 degrees, etc. Notice that images projected onto the retina are non- Euclidean!
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Figure 6.1 The Euclidean geometry of the three-dimensional world turns into something quite different on the curved, two-dimensional retina
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Introduction Binocular summation : The combination (or “summation”) of signals from each eye in ways that make performance on many tasks better with both eyes than with either eye alone The two retinal images of a three-dimensional world are not the same!
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Figure 6.2 The two retinal images of a three-dimensional world are not the same
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Introduction Binocular disparity : The differences between the two retinal images of the same scene Disparity is the basis for stereopsis, a vivid perception of the three-dimensionality of the world that is not available with monocular vision
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Figure 6.3 Visual fields vary, depending on the species (Part 1)
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Figure 6.3 Visual fields vary, depending on the species (Part 2)
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Introduction Monocular depth cue : A depth cue that is available even when the world is viewed with one eye alone Binocular depth cue : A depth cue that relies on information from both eyes Binocular depth cues provide: Convergence Stereopsis Ability of two eyes to see more of an object than one eye
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Monocular Cues to Three-Dimensional Space Occlusion : A cue to relative depth order in which, for example, one object obstructs the view of part of another object
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shown in ( a ), but it is much more likely that it is a generic view of the shapes shown in ( b )
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Monocular Cues to Three-Dimensional Space Metrical depth cue : A depth cue that provides quantitative information about distance in the third dimension Nonmetrical depth cue : A depth cue that provides information about the depth order (relative depth) but not depth magnitude
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Relative size : A comparison of size between items without knowing the absolute size of either one
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class+10+lecture_posted - Sensation and Perception Class X:...

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