synesthesia_slides-1

synesthesia_slides-1 - color-graphemic may be most common...

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Synesthesia : The unusual phenomenon where stimulation of one sensory system evokes a sensation not only in the stimulated system but also in another system (e.g. foods evoke certain colored blurs in addition to their normal taste) Occurs automatically Typically very feature-specific (i.e. not pictures, just properties like color or location) Most frequently congenital and heritable Often accompanied by strong preferences
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Synesthesia was first reported by Fechner in 1871 (as in Fechner’s Law)
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Types of synesthesia Color-graphemic synesthesia : individual letters and numbers evoke distinctive colors Spatial-sequence synesthesia : individual elements in a sequence (numbers, days of week) have corresponding locations in 3-D space Sound-color synesthesia : some kinds of sounds evoke a visual image of corresponding colors
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Numerical-spatial synesthesia : synesthesia in which numbers are perceived to have particular spatial positions Many more varieties have been reported, but
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Unformatted text preview: color-graphemic may be most common • Experimental evidence for synesthesia – Stroop interference task (e.g. if the letter A normally appears red, showing it blue will delay recognition as an A). – Pop-out of color-associated features in visual search can happen (e.g. an S in a field of 5s will pop out to a syntesthete who perceives them to be a different color) – Priming of features (e.g. if the letter A normally appears red, then seeing an A will improve the synesthete’s reaction time on naming the color of a red square compared to • Neurological hypotheses – Unusual connectivity between sensory cortices or between thalamus and cortex • Could result from lack of “pruning” of extra connections that normally occurs during development • Could simply be abnormal connections forming in the first place – Incorrect “gating” of otherwise normal connections between sensory cortices...
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 830:301 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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synesthesia_slides-1 - color-graphemic may be most common...

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