11.Promotion

11.Promotion - Promotion The Marketing Strategy Process...

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Promotion
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Customers Company Competitors Target Market Selection Positioning Market Segmentation Product Place Promotion Price Customer Retention Customer Acquisition Profts The Marketing Mix Context The Marketing Strategy Process Advertising Personal selling Sales promotion Publicity Promotion Mix
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It is a luxury to be understood. (Emerson) Let advertisers spend the same amount of money improving their product as they do advertising, and they wouldn’t have to advertise it. (Rogers) Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, and the trouble is, I don’t know which half. (Wanamaker) Promotion
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Product-Promotion Relationship Although higher quality itself may allow a manufacturer to charge higher prices, there is a signiFcant advertising-product quality interaction that lowers price elasticity even further than would be expected by quality improvements alone. (Curry) Marketers who tell consumers about quality differences in their product command higher prices than marketers who depend on high quality to communicate itself to consumers. (±arris and Reibstein) Hope springs eternal and advertisers continue to hope that clever advertising will sharply improve a brand’s position in the market. This hope is seldom realized, however, except when advertising is taken in conjunction with other events such as improvements or changes in the product. (Bass)
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An important reason for making integrated decisions about the separate marketing mix elements is the presence of, or possibility of a signiFcant level of interaction among the variables which may affect performance measures, that is sales, ROI, etc. (Swenson, Utsey, and Kennedy)
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11.Promotion - Promotion The Marketing Strategy Process...

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