Lab 3(1) - Deirdre Sheehan Physics 134 Lab 3 DC Circuits Voltage Current and Resistance Abstract In this lab we used simple circuits to explore the

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Deirdre Sheehan Physics 134 Lab 3: DC Circuits: Voltage, Current, and Resistance Abstract: In this lab, we used simple circuits to explore the basics of voltage and current, and how these things relate to resistance. The lab was highlighted Ohm’s Law, which is R=V/I; R being resistance, V being voltage, and I being current. We tested resistors in series and in parallel circuits and also tested both circuits with light bulbs so that we would see the differences between the different circuits. Questions: 1. Ohm’s law is defined by the equation R=V/I in which R is resistance, V is voltage, and I is current. It means that when a voltage V is applied across the terminals of a resistance R, a current I flows through the resistor. Voltage (volts) Current (Ampers) .5 0.0104 1 0.0209 1.5 0.0307 2 0.0408 2.5 0.0510 2. Voltage vs. Current
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The slope of the graph is 0.0203. This implies that as voltage and current increase, resistance also increases. 3. Using just one lightbulb, with the voltage as close to 3V as possible, the current was 74.3mA or 0.0743A. The bulb was not very bright. Using bulbs in series, both bulbs were much dimmer
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course PHYSIC 131 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at UMass (Amherst).

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Lab 3(1) - Deirdre Sheehan Physics 134 Lab 3 DC Circuits Voltage Current and Resistance Abstract In this lab we used simple circuits to explore the

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