lab 4 - Lab 4- Oscillations Abstract: In the first part of...

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Lab 4- Oscillations Abstract: In the first part of the experiment, we timed oscillations of a simple pendulum to determine the oscillation periods’ dependence on mass and dependence on length. We confirmed that the oscillation period times are independent of mass, and we calculated how accurate we were in showing oscillation period time’s dependence on length by calculating experimental error for our measured value for g. In the second part of the experiment, we used an oscillating spring to determine the stiffness value, k. We attached different masses to the end of the spring and timed the oscillations, and once after graphing this comparison we determined our experimental value of k. Questions: 1. a. Simple harmonic motion is when a body experiences a force that is directly proportional to the displacement x and points in the opposite direction. The body oscillates and creates a sinusoidal pattern. Examples of simple harmonic motion are the oscillation of a spring and the swinging of a pendulum. b. Force diagram for the mass at the end of a simple pendulum: c. α is the rotational acceleration, or the acceleration of Θ. It is given by a/L. From Newton’s second law, it is known that mgsinΘ= -ma = -mα. This can also be written as α = (gsinΘ)/L.
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When Θ is less than 15 , Θ in radians is about equal to sinΘ in radians, so we can replace sinΘ with Θ. The equation is now α= -gΘ / L. ω 2 = g/L, so substitution tells us that α = - ω 2 Θ. 2.
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lab 4 - Lab 4- Oscillations Abstract: In the first part of...

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