THEA241 paper - Boylan 1 Kelly Boylan Theatre 241-010...

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Boylan 1 Kelly Boylan Theatre 241-010 Question A kboylan@udel.edu The Never Ending Battle: Greeks vs Romans Although theatre has its roots in the Greek culture, theatre is never constant; various cul- tures are always developing different aspects of the theatre. The traditional aspects of theatre along with the less important ones can be traced back to certain cultures which has each had their individual influence on theatre. The Greeks and Romans have both had great impacts on theatre. Even though the Greeks were first, which in turn, structured how theatre would be, the Romans too modified facets of the theatre. The Greeks will always be remembered as being the ones who were first, but they had much more of an impact than just simply being number one. One of the most monumental things the Greeks, more specifically Thespis, brought to the world of theater was as simple as an actor. This small addition of a person not only completely changed the dynamics of the theater, it also allowed for Aeschylus and Sophocles to add more actors. The Greeks felt that theatre benefitted both themselves and their democratic government. They found that theater was both entertaining and educational because it allowed for communication which transferred knowledge. The Gre- cians’ love for theatre reflected their well known artistically based achievements such as; art, philosophy, sculpture and democracy.
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Boylan 2 The Greeks’ intellectual advancements contrast with the Roman’s more practical achieve-
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THEA241 paper - Boylan 1 Kelly Boylan Theatre 241-010...

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