Lecture 22 SRR F-2011

Lecture 22 SRR F-2011 - Biology 313 Lecture 22 Oct 17, 2011...

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Biology 313 Lecture 22 Oct 17, 2011 Porto, Portugal
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Chapter 9: Chromosome Mutations 1. Chromosome morphology 2. Chromosome rearrangements A. Duplications B. Deletions C. Inversions D. Translocations 3. Aneuploidy 4. Polyploidy
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Chapter 9 : Chromosome Mutations (All Ch 9 Problems) Problems Concept Checks 1, 2, 4 - 7 Worked Problems at the end of chapter: 1, 2 Comprehension & Application Questions at end of Chapter: 1-6; 9, 11-13, 16-19, 22, 24, 31-33, 35
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Phenotypic effects of inversions Inversions cause break points in the chromosome that can cause a gene to be interrupted; this can be lethal if the gene is essential Inversions can also disturb gene regulation, called position effects : genes are regulated in a “position dependent” manner (it makes a difference where they reside on a chromosome) (To Elmo)
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Evolution: some human chromosomes differ from those of chimps by a pericentric inversion!!! How could you visualize this????
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Chapter 9: Chromosome Mutations 1. Chromosome morphology 2. Chromosome rearrangements A. Duplications B. Deletions C. Inversions D. Translocations 3. Aneuploidy 4. Polyploidy
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Translocations Translocation = movement of a chromosome segment EF is swapped for QR (an example of Type B-- a reciprocal translocation) TWO TYPES within the same chromosome between non- homologous chromosomes
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Translocations Nonreciprocal translocation : genetic material moves from one nonhomologous chromosome to another Reciprocal translocation : two nonhomologous chromosomes swap segments; example is Robertsonian translocation Two types of translocations between nonhomologous chromosomes:
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Robertsonian Translocation Long arms of two acrocentric chromosomes become joined together, forming: - a large metacentric chromosome with two long arms + - a short chromosome with two very short arms (becomes lost during meiosis) Named after the American insect geneticist W.R.B. Robertson, who discovered them
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Robertsonian Translocation Deletions often accompany translocations; in the case of Robertsonian translocations, a whole small chromosome can be lost– occurs during meiosis or mitosis
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2011 for the course BIOLOGY 313 taught by Professor Steverodermel during the Fall '11 term at Iowa State.

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Lecture 22 SRR F-2011 - Biology 313 Lecture 22 Oct 17, 2011...

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