Lecture 33 SRR F-2011

Lecture 33 SRR F-2011 - Biology 313, Lecture 33 Nov 18,...

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Biology 313, Lecture 33 Nov 18, 2011 Have you figured out what this is?
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Ready for the big game tonight?
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Chapter 12 : DNA Replication & Recombination Problems (through p. 342) Concept Checks: 1 - 10 Worked Problems: 1, 2, 3 Comprehension and Application Questions at end of Chapter: 1 - 15; 18, 19, 21, 23-26, 29, 30
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Chapter 12 : DNA Replication & Recombination 1. DNA replication is semi-conservative: Meselson-Stahl Experiment 2. Modes of replication (general): theta, rolling circle, linear 3. Principles of replication 4. Molecular mechanisms of replication A. Bacterial B. Eukaryotic 5. Recombination
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Eukaryotic DNA Replication Eukaryotic DNA replication- similar to that in prokaryotes (similar overall mechanisms, similar cast of characters) But, there are FIVE major differences since eukaryotes have: 1. Linear chromosomes 2. Packing (including nucleosomes)
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Eukaryotic DNA Replication: POINT ONE 1. Chromatin must be relaxed before it can be replicated -- old nucleosomes must disassemble from the DNA so it can be unwound -- old + newly synthesized histones must then assemble after the DNA has been replicated
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Eukaryotic DNA Replication: POINT TWO 2. Eukaryotic chromosomes contain multiple origins of replication to allow the genome to be replicated quickly The origins differ in sequence and length from species-to-species In bacteria, a single origin ( oriC )
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3. Eukaryotes have MANY DNA polymerases Eukaryotic DNA Replication: POINT THREE There are three major ones that are involved in elongation
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The three predominant elongation enzymes: DNA polymerase α primase activity (makes an RNA primer with free 3’ -OH) DNA polymerase δ : 5’ 3’ polymerase activity on lagging strand DNA polymerase ε : 5’ 3’ polymerase activity on leading strand Eukaryotic DNA Replication: POINT THREE
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4. This point addresses a serious problem for the cell: How does the cell coordinate thousands of origins so they are only replicated at least once but only once during S phase of cell Eukaryotic DNA Replication: POINT FOUR
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4. Answer: -Origins of replication are licensed (approved for replication) before they can serve as a site for initiation of replication - This occurs by a replication licensing
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Lecture 33 SRR F-2011 - Biology 313, Lecture 33 Nov 18,...

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