CH4171-CH6 intro to optical spectroscopy with concept tests

CH4171-CH6 intro to optical spectroscopy with concept tests...

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Nanomedicine and Instrumental Analysis Nanomedicine is the use of nanometer-sized matter in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Gold nanoparticles coated with tumor necrosis factor are promising anti-cancer compounds. How could you quantify the biodistribution of gold in an animal?
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CH 6 Introduction to Spectrometric Methods CH 6 Homework 1. Calculate the frequency, energy in joules, and energy in eV of an X-ray photon with a wavelength of 6.24 Å. 2. When the D line of sodium light impinges an air-diamond interface at an angle of incidence of 30.0 degrees, the angle of refraction is 11.9 degrees. What is n D for diamond? 3. Cs is used extensively in photocells and in television cameras because it has the lowest ionization energy of all the stable elements. What is the maximum KE of a photoelectron ejected from Cs by 555 nm light? Note that if the wavelength of the light used to irradiate the Cs surface becomes longer than 660 nm, no photoelectrons are emitted. 4. Convert the following percent transmittance data into absorbance: 29.9, 86.1, 2.97 Will not be collected.
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CH 6 Introduction to Spectrometric Methods Spectroscopy: Involves the interactions between EM radiation and matter. These interactions provide a number of ways to identify and quantify the presence of molecules in a sample.
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Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation That mysterious property of light-The wave-particle duality The Photoelectric Effect (Discovered by Tesla in 1901) Light in Metal Electrons out
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Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation Concept Te$t Increasing the intensity of the incident light: (A) Increases the KE of the electrons ejected. (C) Has no effect at all. (B) Increases the # of electrons ejected but does not change their KE. E at ν 0 is called the work function of the metal.
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Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation These relationships are not consistent with light behaving as a wave. Instead they are consistent with light acting as a stream of particles now called photons, with each photon responsible for knocking a single electron out of the metal. Increasing the intensity of the light only increases the # of photons impinging the surface. Unless these photons have enough energy, however, it doesn’t matter how many are shot at the surface, no electrons will be ejected.
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Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation Wave nature of light When considering the interactions of light and matter, it is more common to view light as a wave. A single plane of light with perpendicular electric and magnetic fields.
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Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation Velocity of propagation, v i = νλ i Frequency is determined by the source and is invariant. The velocity depends upon the medium through which it travels.
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Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation Concept Te$t Which of the following changes when light passes from one medium to another?
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CH4171-CH6 intro to optical spectroscopy with concept tests...

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