Module 1 - GEOGRAPHY 1700 World Regional Geography Module...

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GEOGRAPHY 1700 World Regional Geography Module 1: Introduction - Geographic Concepts/The Natural and Cultural Landscapes
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GEOGRAPHY 160 Geographic Realms and Regions
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What is geography? It is an integrative discipline - integrating elements from human and environmental systems. Geography literally means "description of the earth”.
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Geography is the study of place and space Geographers study the location and distribution of features on the Earth’s surface Geographers study human activity, the natural environment, and the relationship between the two. Geographers answer where and why questions. The key is a focus on humans - the earth as the home of humans.
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When we examine the geographic framework of the contemporary world, we will examine it by global neighborhoods called geographic realms - the result differences in the natural and cultural landscapes among human societies.
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Geographic realms change over time and where geographic realms meet, transition zones, not sharp boundaries, often mark their contacts . Realms themselves are based on geographers’ notion of regions .
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What is a region? How can we delineate one region from another? The region is a device of areal generalization . Regions break the earth into smaller parts that have a greater degree of similarity. Regions all share certain common characteristics related to the surface of the earth .
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1) All regions are marked by a certain level of homogeneity . Formal regions are relatively uniform throughout their area in terms of an identifying criterion or property . Example: political units; climatic regions; soil distributions; crops - Corn belt, Wheat belt; topography – Appalachia; Rocky Mountains
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A functional region (nodal region) has a definite center or node and is based on a level of homogeneity in spatial interaction patterns that occur between this center (or core) and all other parts of the region (hinterland). For example: labor commuting sheds, newspaper circulation area, retail trade area .
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2) Regions all have area . It is the territory covered by a region that maintains the common thematic characteristics or common spatial relationships. Within its spatial extent, the intensity in the spatial dominance of the characteristic may vary: - central zone of highest concentration and greatest homogeneity is the core. - zone of less intensity and some diversity is the domain . - outer zone of least intensity but still recognizable qualities is the sphere .
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3) All regions have boundaries . To denote a region we delineate it by a boundary or border or outline. boundaries are represented on a map as lines - but regional boundaries are rarely sharply defined.
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Most formal regions and all functional regions have “fuzzy boundaries” or transition zones Well-defined boundaries are only associated with political or administrative units
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4) Regions have a location . Location is often expressed in the name selected to
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Module 1 - GEOGRAPHY 1700 World Regional Geography Module...

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