Module 9 - GEOGRAPHY 160 World Regional Geography Module 9:...

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GEOGRAPHY 160 World Regional Geography Module 9: East Asia
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GEOGRAPHY 160 Defining the Realm of East Asia
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EAST ASIA - located on the eastern edge of Eurasian landmass between 20 o and 50 o N. The largest realm in terms of population and economically the leading non- western realm. Predominately the Realm of China – will examine this realm on a country by country basis.
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China is often compared geographically to the Conterminous United States. China has roughly the same size (3.7 mill sq miles) and latitudinal position as the United States. It does not have two coasts.
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The Physical realm China also has immense physiographic variety that results tectonically from the Indian Plate converging into the Eurasian Plate . China is separated from South Asia by the Himalayas and Karakorum Mtns. and from Central Asia by the Pamir, Tian Shan and Altay Mtns. China also has a location of relative isolation .
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The Qinghai (ching-HYE)- Xizang (sheedz-AHNG) plateau (or Tibetan Plateau) is the world’s largest high-elevation zone (13,000 ft above sea level). In between the western mountain ranges are the Tarim Basin and the Junggar Basin .
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The Qinghai-Xizang Plateau and the western half of China are beset by numerous earthquakes as the result of this tectonic activity .
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In the north central region is a Loess Plateau that is location for the origin of Chinese agriculture. Along the eastern seaboard is a series of coastal plains Northeast China Plain and the North China Plain To the south are upland areas – Southeast Uplands
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Climates – because of the parallel in geographic locations there is also a parallel between the climates of China and those of the United States – moderating influences do not extend as far inland in China as US.
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The Northeast has Humid Continental climates (Dw) The Southeast Uplands and eastern coastal plains have Humid Subtropical climates (Cwa and Cfa) Inner Mongolia & North Central China have Steppe climates . The Qinghai-Xizang Plateau has highland climates and the Northwest is mainly Deserts .
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Major River Systems : rivers have had a major impact on the development of Chinese civilization Most of the major rivers originate in the Western uplands .
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Huang He (hwahng-huh) (or Yellow) River cuts a path from the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau down 10,000 ft to Loess Plain in Northern China. As it leaves the mountains, it broadens & is prone to periodic flooding. The large amount of sediment load makes the Huang He River is the muddiest major river. The sediment and flooding is import- ant for Chinese agriculture and the Huang He is the cradle of Chinese civilization.
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The Huang He has changed its course many times over the centuries and the North China Plain is an alluvium plain that has resulted from the deposition of material from the Huang He . But major flooding has been an historical problem.
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course GEOG 1700 taught by Professor Hanik during the Spring '08 term at UConn.

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Module 9 - GEOGRAPHY 160 World Regional Geography Module 9:...

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