Module 12

Module 12 - GEOGRAPHY 1700 World Regional Geography Module...

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GEOGRAPHY 1700 World Regional Geography Module 12: The Pacific Realm
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GEOGRAPHY 160 Defining the Pacific Realm
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Pacific Realm Largest realm in total surface area but smallest in land area and population – only 7.5 million people . Although there is little land area, the realm is very important because of its marine area.
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The total land area is about 376,000 Square Miles (the Thought to be the last region colonized by humans. The area was colonized by the French, British, and the United States. Its political organization consists of independent states, colonies, dependencies, and administrative units . Tourism is the economic mainstay of the realm ; there is some mining of minerals and there is fishing.
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The island regions consist of high islands which are volcanic in origin and low islands that and are barely above sea level because of their coral origins (atolls ). High islands have more moisture, and better volcanic soils – more agricultural potential. On small islands there is less agriculture and fishing is more prevalent . Sea level rise and global climate change is an important issue for the atoll islands .
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There are more than 40 states under a million people - the UN cutoff for “small states” or ministates . Most of these ministates are island states located in the Pacific realm with land areas between 10,000 and 10 square miles (Tuvalu).
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International Law of the Sea The rights of littoral (coastal) states does not end at lands end. Over time these rights have been defined. The 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) delineated states’ rights to the resources of the oceans. It established four zones of diminishing control: 1) Territorial Sea - 12 nm (22km) full sovereignty (innocent passage); 2) contiguous sea
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course GEOG 1700 taught by Professor Hanik during the Spring '08 term at UConn.

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Module 12 - GEOGRAPHY 1700 World Regional Geography Module...

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