https:::vpn.lib.ucdavis.edu:releases:2010:01:,DanaInfo=www.sciencedaily.com+100128130217

Https:::vpn.lib.ucdavis.edu:releases:2010:01:,DanaInfo=www.sciencedaily.com+100128130217

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Bonobo relaxing on a branch. (Credit: iStockphoto/Ronald Van Der Beek) Web address: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/ 100128130217.htm Developmental Delay May Explain Behavior of Easygoing Bonobo Apes ScienceDaily (Jan. 28, 2010) — New research suggests that evolutionary changes in cognitive development underlie the extensive social and behavioral differences that exist between two closely related species of great apes. The study, published online on January 28th in Current Biology , a Cell Press publication, enhances our understanding of our two closest living relatives, chimpanzees and the lesser-known bonobos, and may provide key insight into human evolution. Although chimpanzees and bonobos have a very close genetic relationship with each other, the two species display major differences in their physical appearance, behavior, and cognition. For example, when compared to chimpanzees, bonobos seem to be much more peaceful and easygoing, retaining juvenile levels of play as adults, exhibiting low levels of aggression towards one another, and being much more likely than adult chimpanzees to share resources. It has beenaggression towards one another, and being much more likely than adult chimpanzees to share resources....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course NPB NPB 100 taught by Professor Campbell during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online