Block_3_Exam_Study_Guide - Kinetic energy The energy an object has due to its motion Potential energy Energy that is stored and held in readiness 1

Block_3_Exam_Study_Guide - Kinetic energy The energy an...

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Kinetic energy: The energy an object has due to its motionPotential energy: Energy that is stored and held in readiness1.Motor vehicle collisions:Vehicular crashes:1.Car against another car, a tree or object.2.Passenger against the interior of the car.3.Passengers internal organs against the solid structures of the body.Frontal (head on)Non Deployed airbags may deploy during extricationSupplemental restraint systems can cause harm whether used properly or improperlyRear-endWhiplash injuries Acceleration type injury to the brain is possible Lateral (t-bone)Lateral whiplashLateral chest and abdomen injuries on the side of the impactPossible fractures of the lower extremities, pelvis, and ribsOrgan damage from the third collisionRolloversInjuries depend on whether the passenger was restrained Ejection or partial ejection is the most common life-threatening event Rotational (spins)Similar to rollovers Opportunities for the vehicle to strike objects Car vs Pedestrian: Often result in patients who have graphic and apparent injuries such as broken bones. But it can also cause unseen injuries to underlying body systems.Car vs bike: Presume patient has sustained an injury to the spinal column or spinal cord.Car vs motorcycle: Helmets do not protect against cervical injury. Assess C-spine and stabilize ifneeded.4 types of motorcycle impacts:Head on crashAngular crashEjectionControlled crash2.Falls: The greater the height of the fall, the greater the potential for injury.
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A fall more than 20 ft is considered significant.Factor in height, type of surface, and part of the body that was hit first, followed by path of energy displacement.Significant fall is 3x the patients height3.Blood flow:3 main parts:The pump (heart)The container (the blood vessels)The fluid (blood and body fluids)Changes to vitals signs from blood loss:Increase heart rateIncreased respiratory rateDecrease in blood pressureArterioles: the smallest branches of arteries leading to the vast network of capillaries.Capillaries: the small blood vessels that connect arterioles and venules.Coagulation: formation of clots to plug openings in injured blood vessels and stop blood flow.Contusion: bruiseEcchymosis: buildup of blood beneath the skin that produces a characteristic blue or black discoloration as a result of injury.Epistaxis: nosebleedHematamesis: vomited bloodHematoma: mass of blood that has collected within damaged tissue beneath the skin or in a body cavity.Hematuria: blood in urineHemophilia: a hereditary condition in which the patient lacks one or more of the bloods normal clotting factors.Hemoptysis: coughing up bloodHemorrhage: bleedingHemostatic agent: chemical that slows or stops bleeding by assuring with clot formation.
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Melena: black, foil smelling, tarry stools containing digested blood.
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