Lecture 23 Electrical and Magnetic Microsystems (1)

Lecture 23 Electrical and Magnetic Microsystems (1) -...

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RF, Electrical, and Magnetic Microsystems Bruce K. Gale Fundamentals of Micromachining RF MEMS Growth Projections RF MEMS Concept Cell Phone Components
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RF MEMS Applications RF MEMS Cell Phone on a Chip Integrated Passive Components
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MEMS Switches Electrostatic Microswitch MEMS Inductors Air Core Ni-Fe Core Alternate Configuration Hi Q Inductor
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Variable Capacitor Other RF MEMS Devices Recinfigurable Antenna Magnetic Assembly Magnets to raise structure 100% efficient assembly
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Magnetic Microvalve Magnetic Microvalve MEMS Transformer The maximum electrostatics potential energy E e,m = ε 0 wvV b 2 /2d E e,m =(l 0 )(l 1 )(l 1 )(l 2 )/(l 1 )=l 3 F=-dE/dx=(l 3 )/(l 1 )=(l 2 ) Electrostatics
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Electrostatics Applications •A c tu a to r s
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Unformatted text preview: Right: Laterally driven electrostatic actuator large displacement devices Electrostatic Actuation Electrostatic Wobble Motor F L 3 Magnetic Force Magnetic materials are not suitable for microactuators, but are good for microsensors. However, there are some microactuators under investigation. Magnetic MEMS Devices Hall Effect Sensors Hall Effect Charges traveling through a perpendicular magnetic field are subject to a deflection by a force known as the Lorentz force This deflection causes a voltage that can be measured in the perpendicular direction The Hall effect was discovered by Edwin Hall In 1879 while he was a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University. Hall-voltage Sensors Carrier Domain Magnetometers Tunneling Magnetometers Magnetic Field Actuators Magnetic Micromotors...
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course MSE 5960 taught by Professor Douglas during the Fall '04 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture 23 Electrical and Magnetic Microsystems (1) -...

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