EMA 4121 Interfacial Engineeering Chapter 1 - Introduction + Chapter 2 - Interaction Forces spring

EMA 4121 Interfacial Engineeering Chapter 1 - Introduction + Chapter 2 - Interaction Forces spring

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EMA 4121: Interfacial Engineering Chapter 1 Defining Interfacial Engineering Interfaces, both internal and external, are found throughout many technology sectors and often dictate or strongly influence performance. This influence is exacerbated by the current trend of miniaturization. “As the ratio of interfacial area to system volume increases, the integrity of the interfacial region is of paramount importance.” Within this class, we will consider: •Phenomenological descriptions of interfacial behavior •Qualitative assessment of forces acting across interfaces •Quantitative determination of forces and the balance thereof Chapters 1 & 2: Interfacial Engineering KEY CONCEPTS (Note the application of key concepts from previous courses in the present discussion) What is Interfacial Engineering? Why it is important to learn about it ? What are some of the important applications of Interfacial Engineering? What are interaction forces between particles and how to estimate them (Hamaker constant, van der Waals Interaction potential? How to estimate interaction potential forces/energy between curved surfaces (Derjaguin approximation ? What is the theoretical approach to determining surface tension (van der Waals approach) ? Interfacial Phenomena 10 9 m1 0 8 0 7 m 10 6 m 10 5 m 10 4 m 10 3 m From nano… to macro Interfacial phenomena governs interactions ranging from protein-protein interactions to the formation of the deltas in the rivers. Beyond the classic example of wetting, technological examples where interfaces are inherently involved in design and operation include: Hard disk storage
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Composites •Carbon reinforced plastics • Concrete •Bone (hydroxyapatite reinforced with collagen fibers) Advanced Ceramics The brittle nature of ceramic materials limits performance by introducing a lack of mechanical integrity and can be related to the presence of internal structural defects. The production of modern ceramic films and composites is often accomplished through sol gel techniques in which ceramic oxides and their hydroxides are employed in the form of small colloidal particles stabilized through the presence of a polymer coating. Microelectronics Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) Chemical purification/filtration Food Flowability Texture Fortification/Delivery of Vitamins, Nutrients Pharmaceuticals Controlled drug delivery Agglomeration of dry powders Dispersion in biofluids Example of Multilevel Metallization Source : Scientific American, May 1997.
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CMP Process s p slurry feed polishing pad plate wafer pressure Chemical actions from aqueous media Mechanical actions from free abrasives Stability of Particulate Systems Paints Opacity Color Strength Gloss Viscosity Food Texture Structure -Creaming - Settling Paper Quality Uniformity Strength Microelectronics Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP)
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EMA 4121 Interfacial Engineeering Chapter 1 - Introduction + Chapter 2 - Interaction Forces spring

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