Lab 1 - Aggregate Testing

Lab 1 - Aggregate Testing - Laboratory 1 Aggregate Testing...

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Laboratory 1: Aggregate Testing Civil Engineering Materials CRN: 40647 Date Performed: 09/26/2011 Date Submitted: 10/07/2011 Lab Group 4: Daniel Kirkaldy Miken Shah Jonathan Sparacio Brandon Taylor Jacob Taylor Nicholas Vaspoli Introduction: 1
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The objectives of this lab were: 1) Determine the bulk unit weight and percentage of air voids in the rodded coarse aggregate sample 2) Evaluate the gradation of the fine aggregate sample and determine its fineness modulus 3) Determine the bulk specific gravity, the bulk specific gravity saturated surface-dry (SSD), the apparent specific gravity, and the percent absorption of the coarse aggregate 4) Calculate the fine aggregate angularity (FAA) of the fine aggregate sample 5) Evaluate unexpected errors and determine possible causes Theoretical Information/Literature Review: Aggregates are individual particles usually containing crushed rocks, sand, and gravel that are used as underlying materials. Aggregates are used to create a stable and sound base for roadways and to create foundations for buildings. Aggregates have many important properties used in portland cement and asphalt, in particular, such as angularity, elongation, particle size, toughness, abrasion resistance, and soundness. The scope of this lab was limited to such aggregate properties as particle size and gradation, bulk specific gravity and absorption, bulk density, percentage of voids, and fine aggregate angularity. Bulk Unit Weight and Void Percentage Bulk unit weight, or bulk density, measures the weight of an aggregate per unit volume. By knowing bulk unit weight one can determine the percentage of voids when looking at portland cement, which can help determine how much binder will be needed and how dense the blend will be. According to ASTM C29 procedure, Bulk unit weight is the weight of aggregate divided by the volume of the container in which it was measured (Materials for Civil and Construction Engineers, 2011). The equation for bulk unit weight is below, in Equation 1: (1) where M is the bulk unit weight of the aggregate in g/cm 3 , G is the weight of the dry aggregate sample in grams, T is the weight of the measure in grams, and V is the volume of the container in cm 3 . In order to determine the percentage of air voids in a mixture or blend of aggregates the bulk dry specific gravity must be known. Equation 2, below, shows how to determine the percentage voids between aggregates. % (2) where P is the percentage of voids in the aggregate sample, S is the bulk specific gravity of the aggregate, and M is the bulk unit weight of the aggregate in g/cm 3 , and W is the unit weight of water in g/cm 3 . 2
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Particle Size and Gradation The particle size and gradation are important when determining how much coarse or fine aggregate should be used to create a blend. Aggregates are classified by size in three categories: coarse (>4.75 mm), fine (<4.75 mm and >0.075 mm), and dust (<0.075 mm). (Personal Communication, Mehta 2011). Aggregates that are coarse use less binder than fine aggregates which means they cost less, and they also have a higher load carrying capacity.
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