HR30_post - Third midterm exam this Saturday at 8:00 –...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Third midterm exam this Saturday, 11/12/2011 at 8:00 – 10:00 AM • Test 2 covers material of chapters 27, 28 and 29 • Room assignment, last name, first letter A – R: NSC 225 S – Z: NSC 201 Dr. Petrou’s section in Knox 20 1 • Please bring with you the following items: c 2 pens c 1 calculator (make sure batteries have decent EMF) c 3 pages of 8.5 × 11 sheet with equations; will be handed with your test c Your student ID Students eligible for academic adjustments, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources to schedule exam, either on Friday/11 th , Monday/14 th , or Tuesday/15 th at the latest Chapter 30 Induction and Inductance Will study the following topics • Faraday’s law of induction • Lenz’s law • Electric field induced by a changing magnetic field troduce the notion of ductance nd utual 2 • Introduce the notion of inductance and mutual inductance • How the current changes in RL circuits • Calculate the energy stored in a magnetic field • We know that an electric current produces magnetic field in a nearby space • It turns out that the reverse can also happen: a magnetic eld can produce an electric field that can drive a current Magnetic Field Can Produce an Electric Current 3 field can produce an electric field that can drive a current • This link between a magnetic field and the electric field it induces is called Faraday’s law of induction • In series of experiments, Michael Faraday in England and Joseph Henry in the USA were able to generate electric current without the use of batteries • We will discuss experiments similar to the ones that led Faraday to formulate Faraday’s Law of Induction Induction Experiment 4 • The shown circuit consists of a wire loop connected to an ammeter. There is no emf in the circuit ⇒ so there is no current • If we move the bar magnet toward the loop, the ammeter will register a current in the loop • The current disappears when the magnet stops moving • If we move the magnet away, the ammeter will again register a current which now has the opposite direction • If we experiment with the device for a while, we will be able to conclude the following: – A current appears only if there is relative motion between the loop and the magnet ; the current disappears when the relative motion between them ceases – Fast motion produces greater current Induction Experiment (cont’d) 5 • The current produced in the loop is called an induced current • The work done per unit charge to produce the induced current is called an induced emf • This process of producing the current and emf is called induction – If moving the magnet’s north pole toward the loop causes a current in one direction , then moving the north pole away causes current in opposite direction . Moving the south pole toward or away from the loop also causes currents, but in the reversed directions Loop 1 Loop 2 • A scheme of an experiment with two nearby conducting loops is shown in Fig.nearby conducting loops is shown in Fig....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/18/2011 for the course PHY 108 taught by Professor Iashvili during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

Page1 / 35

HR30_post - Third midterm exam this Saturday at 8:00 –...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online