DC Circuits Lab - PHYS 2300 DC Circuits Lab Ohms Law The...

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PHYS 2300 – DC Circuits Lab Ohm’s Law The first thing we will do is verify that a resistor obeys Ohm’s law by measuring V and I for a few voltages. It is not expected that Ohm’s law will be a surprising new result to you (I hope not anyway!). This is more of a way for you to become familiar with the breadboard, power supplies, and other equipment that you will be using extensively throughout this course. The breadboard, in particular, gives students trouble the first time they are exposed to it. Which of the holes are connected and which aren’t? What’s with the little spaces between sections? Are the holes powered when I turn it on? You are meant to become intimately familiar with your breadboard and by the end of the course you will be able to use it blindfolded.
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2 In the haze of uncertainty that many students have with regard to the breadboard, they will avoid using it to build circuits. Resistors are commonly “floated” in mid air by clip connections to power supplies. DON’T DO THIS! Learn to build a clean, organized circuit on the breadboard. In building your circuits on the breadboard, it is helpful to maintain some design conventions, e.g., establishing power busses to distribute power to your circuit, having the circuit flow from left to right, always placing transistors and chip components straddling a breadboard gap, etc.
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3 Use the variable DC supply built into your breadboard and hook up the circuit shown above. Note that voltages are measured between points on a circuit while currents are measured through a part of a circuit. This means you will usually have to break the circuit to measure current. NOTE: When choosing resistors, you need to consider tolerance and power rating as well as the value. The tolerance (amount actual value may vary from marked value) is usually given by the 4 th color band. For precision resistors, value and tolerance may be written on the resistor body. The power rating is related to physical size. The resistors in the small red cabinets vary from 1/8 to 2
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DC Circuits Lab - PHYS 2300 DC Circuits Lab Ohms Law The...

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