Sigfigs - Significant Figure Rules Based off of a Chemistry...

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Significant Figure Rules Based off of a Chemistry Website There are three rules on determining how many significant figures are in a number: 1. Non-zero digits are always significant. Ex: The number 123,456,789 has nine significant figures 2. Any zeros between two significant digits are significant. Ex: The number 10,000,001 has 8 significant figures 3. A final zero or trailing zeros in the decimal portion ONLY are significant. Ex: The number 2,500 has only two significant figures The number 2.500 has four significant figures Focus on these rules and learn them well. They will be used extensively throughout the remainder of this course. You would be well advised to do as many problems as needed to nail the concept of significant figures down tight and then do some more, just to be sure. What “Zeros” are Not Discussed Above Zero Type #1 : Space holding zeros on numbers less than one. The digits that are NOT significant are in boldface: 0. 00 500 0. 0 3040 These zeros serve only as space holders. They are only there to put the decimal point in its correct location. They DO NOT involve measurement decisions. Upon writing the numbers in scientific notation (5.00 x 10 -3 and 3.040 x 10
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2011 for the course CHE 131 taught by Professor Kerber during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Sigfigs - Significant Figure Rules Based off of a Chemistry...

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